Octopus Bites

bec22

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Thank you DWhatley - you have been extreemley helpful in all posts :)
I will let you know how I go with my new friend!!
 

MissPH

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Just thought I would add my 2 cents since I had a nip from my new baby:

Species of octopus Callistoctopus Luteus (Starry Night octopus)
Age of octopus: Unsure, not captive bred.
Size of mantle: 1 inch approx
Type of bite: Series of bites
How did it occur? During acclimatisation to my tank water in a bucket he wrapped his tentacles around my forefinger and started having a nibble. I didn't want to hurt him by forcing him off so just left him to it until he loosened his grip then he shook off easily.
Reaction: He held on maybe 3 minutes or so during which time he was nibbling. It wasn't painful until he broke the skin but even then it wasn't too bad. My hand and lower arm went tingly and a bit numb soon afterwards which lasted about 4-5 hours. There was a little bleeding but not much. The next day I was fine. I did wash the wound immediately but it got infected regardless - or rather my lymphatic system did. A week later I woke up with swelling in the same finger and tracking up my arm along my lymph vessel. This seems to have all cleared up with a course of augmenitin, although my finger is still swollen 3 days into the course of antibiotics. The wound site itself is fully healed and you can hardly see it.
Comments about the bite and your reaction: If this were to happen again I would go straight to the docs for antibiotics even if I feel fine. Even though I didn't feel poorly the tracking up my arm and having to wait 4 hours to be seen in A&E wasn't fun!
 

Jean

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I think Jean might have some seafood allergies?
Nope...just don't realy like to eat seafood.........I'm allergic to peanuts and other legumes! Having said that I have had prolonged responses to octopus bites.....so perhaps have some sensitivity!

Species of octopus O. huttoni
Age of octopus: <1 year
Size of mantle: ~6cm
Type of bite: locked bite, broke skin
How did it occur? during tank cleaning, octi had been put in the tank by another staff member who neglected to record it :roll: I pick up a shell and the octi, who had taken up residence in it objected and bit!
Reaction:broke skin, some bleeding burning pain, swelling and loss of fine motor control to fingers, lasted over a week......hmmmmmm maybe there is some allergy there! Although I have heard of similar responses (and worse!) from this species!!!
Comments about the bite and your reaction: Main issue at the time.......we were open to the public and I had a young family watching me clean, I had to say I was playing with the animal, which was NOT what I wanted to say (that was not for tender young ears!). I did suggest however that they shouldn't play with octopus!
Photos: none too busy finding aformentioned staff member and reaming him out!
 

DWhatley

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Infiltrated plaques resulting from an injury caused by the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris): a case report
Vidal Haddad Jr,Claudia Alves de Magalhães 2014 (full PDF - includes photos)

Abstract
Several species of octopus are considered venomous due to toxins present in the glands
connected to their “beak”, which may be associated with hunt and kill of prey. Herein, we
report an accident involving a common octopus (Octopus vulgaris) that injured an instructor

during a practical biology lesson and provoked an inflamed infiltrated plaque on the hand of
the victim. The lesion was present for about three weeks and was treated with cold
compresses and anti-inflammatory drugs. It was healed ten days after leaving a hyperchromic
macule at the bite site. The probable cause of the severe inflammation was the digestive
enzymes of the glands and not the neurotoxins of the venom.
 
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DWhatley

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Pseudomonas oryzihabitans cutaneous ulceration from Octopus vulgaris bite: a case report and review of the literature.
Birgit Angela Aigner , Markus Ollert, Florian Seifert, Johannes Ring, Sabine Gisela Plötz 2011 (full text available for free signup on Research Gate)

Link includes several interesting citations with links on other bite cases

ABSTRACT Octopus vulgaris is a common marine animal that can be found in nearly all tropical and semitropical waters around the world. It is a peaceful sea dweller with a parrotlike beak, and its primary defense is to hide through camouflaging adjustments. Bites from animals of the class Cephalopoda are very rare. We describe a boy who was bitten on his forearm by an Octopus vulgaris.
A 9 -year-old boy was bitten by an Octopus vulgaris while snorkeling. There was no strong bleeding or systemic symptoms; however, 2 days later, a cherry-sized, black, ulcerous lesion developed, surrounded by a red circle that did not heal over months and therefore had to be excised. Histologic examination showed ulceration with extensive necrosis of the dermis and the epidermis. A microbial smear revealed Pseudomonas (formerly known as Flavimonas) oryzihabitans. After excision, the wound healed within 2 weeks, without any complications or signs of infection.
To the best of our knowledge, this case represents the first report of an Octopus vulgaris bite resulting in an ulcerative lesion with slow wound healing owing to P oryzihabitans infection. We recommend greater vigilance regarding bacterial contamination when treating skin lesions caused by marine animals.
 

jugglematt

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I've had a few experiences with octopus bites.
With the gloomy octopus .
After a number of experiences diving. with bold octopus grabbing my hand and having a nibble on my finger till I had enough , I decided to let it go a bit further and see what happens .
While on a scuba dive in Jervis bay , I made friends with a gloomy octopus , who came out of his den and grabbed on to my hand , he pulled my hand into his den and started exploring me with his suckers . He then moved my hand to his mouth area and started nibbling . I had the feeling he was just checking me out , having a taste, there was no aggressive behaviour .
After a couple of mins of this he managed to get a good few nips in and I guess he broke the skin and some of his saliva made it in ,
I noted a numbness in my hand , which started to travel up my arm . That's when I decided to end the experiment .
So now I know that the gloomy octopus has something in its saliva and its prob not a good idea to let one take a chunk out of your hand .

When I got back on my boat I noted a small bite , and after about an hour all feeling fully returned to my hand and arm .
Sorry for the long post
matt
 

tonmo

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wow! :eek2: not a long post - great story... pretty adventurous of you to allow that kind of exploring!

:sink:
 

nguyentam140991

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Good advice! Species identification is difficult in the field, the amount of venom delivered by a bite can vary considerably, and people may be allergic to the compounds delivered. I would like to have an image of the wound to include in PowerPoint that I present to classes going into the field. Thanks for sharing your experience with us.
 

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