octopets

Discussion in 'Octopus Care' started by j_man, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. j_man

    j_man Larval Mass Registered

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    What species are the ones on octo pets? and secondly what is there average lifespan. And what available cephlapod has the longest life span?
     
  2. Feelers

    Feelers Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    Octopets carries O. Bimaculoides or "Bimacs".

    The longest lived available ceph is the Nautilus - dont go there :grin:, requires a huge tank and chiller and lots of research.

    Check out this if you havent already...... http://www.tonmo.com/cephcare/cephcarejump.php

    :welcome: to Tonmo, do lots of reading, there's heaps of info on this site.
     
  3. cthulhu77

    cthulhu77 Titanites Supporter

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    Even under the best of care, cephalopods are short lived in captivity...be sure this is something you really want to undertake prior to trying !
     
  4. nini

    nini Wonderpus Registered

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    O. Bimaculoides have a life span of 12-18 months, there life span may depend on the temperature of the water and their enviornment.
     
  5. Armstrong

    Armstrong Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    Incase you were wondering also...the longest lived octopus species is generally the Giant pacific with an average lifespan of about 2 1/2 to 3 yrs. Otherwise theirs the arctic octopus living up to 6 yrs...but thats WAY beyond the limits, lol. They live up north in the deep depths of the cold ocean.
     
  6. DHyslop

    DHyslop Architeuthis Supporter

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    That 12-18 months for a bimac sounds good on paper, but I believe the longest that a bimac has lived for anyone on here is around 8-10 months? If anyone has had a different experience, I'm sure they'll correct me.

    Dan
     
  7. dbrooks

    dbrooks Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    WOW! Is that really the case?! I was hoping for at least a 12 month ROI...
     
  8. oceanbound

    oceanbound O. bimaculoides Registered

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    also bimacs, if farm raised, are said to be relatively hardy. i mean as much as any octo can be hardy.lol
     
  9. Nancy

    Nancy Titanites Staff Member Moderator

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    The first generation of Tonmo bimacs that I kept records on had three bimacs that lasted 10 months or more. Since they were wild caught,they tended to be a bit older when they arrived, too. My Ollie was 3-4 months old when she came (my estimate) and lived about 10 months, so that would make her 13-14 months old when she died.

    No one here on Tonmo has been able to keep a bimac in a tank for much more than 10 months and this corresponds to the experiences of other bimac keepers before Tonmo.

    I don't know where the "1 1/2 years" comes from - can't seen to track it down.

    Nancy
     
  10. TidePool Geek

    TidePool Geek O. vulgaris Registered

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    Howdy,

    Cephbase shows "Age at Maturity" for O. bimaculoides as 341 days:

    http://www.cephbase.utmb.edu/spdb/lifehistory.cfm?CephID=508

    Unfortunately I can't find what they define as Maturity. If they mean sexual maturity, it's not unreasonable to assume they've got a total lifespan on the order of 12 to 15 months since octos don't necessarily breed immediately on 'coming of age'. Even if a bimac did breed as soon as possible, it's also known that females can delay fertilization for a fairly long time while waiting for optimum conditions to lay their eggs.

    Since Octopets ships their bimacs at a pretty young age it seems possible that there could be a bit of extra life extension while the animal is waiting for Mr/Ms Right to come along.

    Temperature does affect both lifespan and growth rate. Here's a paper on the subject:
    http://www.cephbase.utmb.edu/Tcp/pdf/Wood99.pdf
    Here's a quote from that paper:
    *****************************
    Octopus bimaculoides
    kept at 23 °C had their life span shortened by about
    20% but were three times larger when 5 months old
    compared to octopuses raised at 18 °C (Forsythe and
    Hanlon 1988).
    *****************************
    Hope this helps.

    Agedly yours,

    Alex
     

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