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Octo Den and Passages

Vonsamhain

Cuttlefish
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Jul 23, 2007
Messages
26
#1
When considering a full grown Bimac... what would be an "ideal" den size in your experience? As well as a comfortable diameter passageway between caves in the network? Like a 5"X5" den sizes and a 3 diameter passageways in the cave side of the tank or is that still way to small? I know they could definately fit through just about anything...but Im talking about what they would like for an ideal.
 

aximbigfan

GPO
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Joined
Jan 17, 2006
Messages
167
#2
its best just to leave some materials in the tank and let the octo make his own den IIRC. octos really like to build their own den, and might not feel comfertable in a den that wasnt made by them.

chris
 

Nancy

Titanites
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Nov 20, 2002
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5,647
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Dallas Texas
#3
You could also build dens of varous sizes to accomodate your octopuses' growth, plus leave some building materials in the tank.

Nancy
 

Vonsamhain

Cuttlefish
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Jul 23, 2007
Messages
26
#4
Thanks for the feedback. I will most likely build several cave sizes at both ends. I would like to create a natural environment for the octo with only native elements to the tank. Im thinking about a bimac or a red, which will both be cold water (and local) and will have tank insulation/chilller (required in the hot livermore area where i live). I got a free 55 gallon acrylic tank that Im drilling for an overflow. I wanted to go bigger (90-125 gallon) but I can argue with FREE.

What size is then den for your Bimacs and Reds at adult size (that they build)? Do the tend to like them at the bottom or top of the tank? Do they rather have sand or bare rock for there dens? I plan on letting the octo do some of his own home modeling, but the basic cave network will need to be laid out first, then the octo can chose from one of the half dozen or so den-like caves.

I have accumulated a large amount of random parts/filters/heaters and plumbing that I will most likely never use and the wife tells me to throw out. I may start a thread one day giving them away for FREE to new/young hobbiests, and just charge for shipping.
 

shipposhack

Haliphron Atlanticus
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Joined
Dec 16, 2005
Messages
672
Location
Laie, Hawaii
#5
By "red" do you mean O. Vulgaris? If you do your original tank plans would be a good suit for him. With the 55 I would stick with a Bimac. Fine sand is a good substrate for an octopus. You can throw in rocks of various shapes and sizes and some shells from clams, hermits, or snails in the tank along with other things so your octo can create it's den.
 

monty

TONMO Supporter
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Mar 8, 2004
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4,887
#6
shipposhack;98688 said:
By "red" do you mean O. Vulgaris? If you do your original tank plans would be a good suit for him. With the 55 I would stick with a Bimac. Fine sand is a good substrate for an octopus. You can throw in rocks of various shapes and sizes and some shells from clams, hermits, or snails in the tank along with other things so your octo can create it's den.
Since he said California, I imagine he means O. rubescens... although GPOs are reddish, too...
 

Vonsamhain

Cuttlefish
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Jul 23, 2007
Messages
26
#7
Monty is right... although trying to shoehorn a GPO in there would be funny, AND sad at the same time. I meant either a Bimac or O.rubescens. Nothing bigger than either of those. I may just stick to natural rock as you guys are suggesting.

Do they need rather smooth rock for their delicate skin?...or are the porous rocks OK to use? Im not talking lava rock or anything. What kind of rock do you suggest?
 

Neogonodactylus

Haliphron Atlanticus
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Mar 17, 2003
Messages
662
#8
For my O. rubescens, I use local weathered and rounded cobble collected on the beach. Some is basalt, but most of it is shale. The den that an adult builds is typically soft ball size.

Roy
 

Vonsamhain

Cuttlefish
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Jul 23, 2007
Messages
26
#10
Well, I ran into some roadblocks, from some finacial reasons. But I finally finshed all my major purchases for this project. Here is what I finished with:

-55 gallon Tru-vu (free) Insulated for effeciency, custom overflow in the corner
-15 gallon sump made out of a chest cooler (inlcudes both a bioblock section w/ a micro screen, and a sand bed/live rock section
-Berlin turbo Protein skimmer
-1/10 HP Arctica chiller (B-Day present from the wife)
-Live Sand (from the beach in Northern Cal, local)
-Live Rock (local also)
-3 stage DI water kit with shut off floater
-Lots of high grade plumbing supplies


Just need to finish off my plumbing, and get it started on cycling a bit, Im going to cycle in the high 70's, then drop the temp slowly to about 60-65 before intro of the octo:

Either I'll travel South for a bimac, or just go local for a red (rubescens). I hear they are rather abundant if you know where to look. I like the challenge/personality problems (hehe) of the red. I always liked animals with a bit of a nasty disposition.
 

cuttlegirl

Colossal Squid
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Sep 16, 2005
Messages
4,930
Location
Pittsburgh, PA
#11
Why are you cycling at 70? Wouldn't it be better to cycle at the temperature you want? I am thinking of the little critters (and bacteria) in the live rock. If the ambient temperature in your area is 60-65, then you should cycle at that temperature. The organisms in the live rock are most likely adapted to thrive at that temperature.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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Sep 4, 2006
Messages
19,891
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Gainesville, GA
#12
Cuttlegirl,
I have found that most everything of the nature of your concern does fine if you slowly lower the temperature over a week. Cycling a tank in the low 60's takes FOREVER.

I have algae problems in most of my tanks (yes, I am guilty of overfeeding) and use a large sea hare to resolve the problem. He goes from tank to tank with no difficulty (I have had him almost two years). When he is needed in the cold tank his whole digestion slows and it takes him two to three times as long to clean up. This works out well to keep him fed if he is not needed in the other tanks but does dramatically distinguish the differences in tank temperature.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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Sep 4, 2006
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19,891
Location
Gainesville, GA
#14
Bigpapa,
I do not put Jaba in the octo tanks. I don't know if an octo would eat a sea hare or not (Jaba is 4-6 inches long and about 2 inches thick) but I keep very low lighting in the octo tanks and do not have a green algae problem there. Pacific Sea hares (there is a smaller one from the Atlantic but it does not survive well in aquariums) need LOTS of green algae and a single tank would starve a hare in a couple of weeks (possibly less). I have two 45's with sumps (one with LR in and continuous lighting), a 140 reef and a 4 foot tall hallegon lit 30 gallon anemone tank that keep him well fed. I only mentioned him to highlight the metabolism differences between cold and warm tanks.
 

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