Non-ceph: Fossil ID request

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Fossils' started by brntbow, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. brntbow

    brntbow Larval Mass Registered

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    i have pictures that may be of a giant imprint of some kind. i need experts!

    footprint? tail print? what creature left this behind if any?

    these were taken in North Bay, Ontario Canada

    please reply here or email answers to brntbow@netscape.net

    thanks!
     

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  2. brntbow

    brntbow Larval Mass Registered

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    here are some more....
     

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  3. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Hi brntbow,

    Welcome to TONMO!

    I'm afraid I can't see much fossily at all in those pictures. A google search of North Bay, Ontario reveals that the rocks there are mostly volcanic granite and therefore could not contain fossils. One really needs sedimentary deposits I'm afraid.

    Maybe someone will have a different opinion, but I think those features are purely geological.

    Sorry old chap!

    Phil
     
  4. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Looks like folded veins of some kind, certainly not a giants footprint. :smile:
     
  5. pipsquek

    pipsquek Wonderpus Supporter

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    I have to agree with Phil, and would add that it is likely that the depression you are referring to is likely caused by erosion, since variable heat in magma produces different molecular organization resulting in varying hardnesses. Think of the Japanese method of producing swords, with the cutting edge harder than the rest of the blade, which is created by wrapping the blade with clay to act as a heat sink, thereby producing two different hardnesses out of the same metal. The softer one, in the case of the rock, would wear away quicker from the forces of erosion.
     
  6. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    That's a great analogy there. Thanks Pipsquek!
     

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