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[News] Operation Deep Scope spots a large squid

Phil

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#1
Operation Deep Scope currently underway exploring the deep water marine habitats in the Gulf of Mexico spotted a large squid, possibly a six-foot Mastigoteuthis, above a brine pool with its 'Eye in the Sea' camera at a depth of over 2,000 feet.

Details here including a film of the encounter which happened on the 10th August.

 

Clem

Architeuthis
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#2
:shock:

Folks, this is why it's important to look at all the returned items in a Google News search. You'll get more than the Canary Islands squid you're looking for. Much more.

That's some video, Phil. A suggestive chain of events, wouldn't you say? The researchers activated the "jellyfish lure," a sequence of blinking lights designed to attract jellies, and a big male squid shows up with its unit hanging out.

Thanks a ton, Phil.

Clem
 

Melissa

Larger Pacific Striped Octopus
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#3
The big isopods in the bottom pictures look like shrimp to me. Now I understand why octos eat them. Steve, have you tried them? Are they good? Looks like fish for dinner tonight.

Melissa
 

Phil

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#5
Anyone interested in the giant isopod Bathynomus should have a look at this page. Please don't take on face value this 'living trilobite' nonsense. The two groups were quite separate despite the physical similarity.
 

Emperor

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#6
A new report:

Mystery Squid In Gulf Helps Prove New Ocean Research Concept

POSTED: 11:13 am EST March 1, 2005

FORT PIERCE, Fla. -- It took only a minute for scientists to discover a new deep-sea species with an experimental infrared camera and light-emitting artificial lure.


Now, the National Science Foundation has agreed to spend $500,000 to refine the concept developed by the Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Fort Pierce.

A large, 6-foot squid of a type never before photographed attacked the bait, a bioluminescent electronic "jellyfish," about 60 seconds after it was turned on in August off the Louisiana coast during Operation Deep Scope.

.........
Source

Emps
 

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