New Video of Kashmir 'walking'

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Journals' started by tonmo, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

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    In light of the recent passing of joefish84's bimac Kashmir, I've finally gotten around to compressing and posting an amazing video he provided of Kashmir showing the "walking" behavior which made a splash in the news earlier this year. To our knowledge this is the first video clip of a bimac "walking".

    [​IMG]

    Video Gallery -- it's the entry marked 12/28/05.

    RIP Kashmir -- thanks to joefish84 for the great video and pictures, and for taking such good care of his octo.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2014
  2. main_board

    main_board Vampyroteuthis Supporter

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    Wow! That was a serious pounce! joefish, did kash always walk away when carrying prey, or did you just get lucky and catch him in the act this one time? Fantastic footage. The walking seemed like it took no effort and came very naturally to the creature. Kash will be greatly missed.

    Cheers!
     
  3. mucktopus

    mucktopus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

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    Nice video of Kashmir hunting- the swimming pounce is fantastic and shows how well they can move quickly while keeping an eye on they prey. Once he catches the crab he crawls backward using a form of crawling that's similar to (but still distinct from) the bipedal walking reported last spring. In the video we can see that he's using arm pairs three and four. The arms on the left side are visible, and you can see the ends of the corresponding arms on the right side rolling back, also involved in the gait. The bipedal octopuses used arm pair four- but we did find one little octo that tried using a third arm in a similar way (he was missing both arms in pair four). As shown in your video, these arm pairs can work together to crawl-- yet another example of how diverse octopus locomotion can be!
     
  4. joefish84

    joefish84 Sepia elegans Registered

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    i didnt know that mine was the only bimac recorded doing this. he did this all the time.
     
  5. joefish84

    joefish84 Sepia elegans Registered

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    by the way how do you play a ram file
     
  6. monty

    monty Colossal Squid Staff Member Supporter

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    realplayer -- www.real.com
     
  7. joefish84

    joefish84 Sepia elegans Registered

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    got it
     
  8. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

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    :smile: I was referencing what you said in email when you sent it --
    I hadn't seen a bimac do it either, so here we are!
     
  9. joefish84

    joefish84 Sepia elegans Registered

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    oh ok
     
  10. Armstrong

    Armstrong Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    I thought the video was pretty cool, but brief. At first it looks like the ordinary movement of an octopus with it's prey. In Ultimate Guide Octopus it stated that Octo's sometimes use their arms as legs to bump along the sea floor. I guess this is the first time a Bimac had done it? It doesn't look like the bi-pedal locomotion done in the news.
     
  11. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

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    Really? I disagree -- it's clearly holding the crab with all but a couple of arms, and it's using the free ones to get back to his den, one after another -- seems pretty straight-forward to me! *shrug*
     
  12. Armstrong

    Armstrong Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    Im not sure. I viewed it again...in full screen and it looks like regular "bumping" to me or walking on the bottom as usually done by octopuses roaming the seafloor or getting their prey to their lair. The bi-pedal locomotion shown that iv seen has the octopus with only 2 arms clearly walking, while the rest of the body is straight, erect and frozen...the other arms are curled tightly together and is usually done to escape predators without too much notice. This however looks like natural body movement to me done by all octopuses. The Ultimate Guide Octopus shows a brief clip of the technique of bumping.
     
  13. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

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    ah... OK, I'll look into "bumping"... not sure I'd know the difference so will educate myself...
     
  14. joefish84

    joefish84 Sepia elegans Registered

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    even if it is bumbing or whatever he did stand up erect on 2 legs many times and one time he did it and waved at me.
     
  15. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

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    Yeah, I'm not able to find anything on "bumping" -- not sure what's being referred to here... but I do know in that a couple of the other videos I've seen, the octopus does appear to be curled up in a ball, and the two arms used for "walking" do seem to be more extended than Joefish's bimac. But I think in this context it's a fairly minor difference -- this bimac here appears to be putting one arm in front of the other, pushing them against the ground, using two arms, and that's how he's travelling from one spot to the other -- much like walking. To Armstrong's point, I've seen more stark examples, but from my own observation (for whatever it's worth), I'd put it in the same category as the others: "walking" behavior.
     
  16. Armstrong

    Armstrong Vampyroteuthis Registered

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    That's neat and I wish he was alive so we could have seen it. Im not sure if bi-pedal locomotion is only used for one purpose because according to the news about them doing this behavior, it was just seen and only used to escape danger like a frozen rock drifting away. Im guessing it depends under the situations..if its motivated enough to do the exact behaviors.

    However, catching prey and bringing it back to its lair doesn't seem like the motivation to do a precise bi-pedal locomotion. But im not saying im right cuz you never know. Im just saying that so far, it just looks natural and ordinary and done by most octo's simply walking along the seafloor.
     
  17. joefish84

    joefish84 Sepia elegans Registered

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    i just know that almost every large meal that was too big for him to swim with back to the den would be carried while walking... im sure that if you try to feed your octos a fairly larger meal than the octo itself that it will do the same thing because mine did it all the time. kash had a mantle of about 4 inches and i would often feed him live blue crabs with shells about 4-6 inches wide without problems and he would walk back to his den with them instead of swimming like he would with smaller food such as fiddlers or shrimp. i think that the fact that the food weighed more than he did and that it wasnt able to be concealed easily into his arms while swimming had alot to do with it so instead he just "walked" and carried the food back.
     
  18. mucktopus

    mucktopus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

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    The video shows Kash using two left arms and two right arms (pairs 3 and 4, total of four arms) so he was crawling rather than walking bipedally. As you have brought up, he did this when carrying prey, and we have video of O. marginatus and A. aculeatus doing the same. Large prey probably prevents the octos from using a sprawling posture while crawling, so the arms are more stilt-like. A. aculeatus can also walk bipedally while carrying prey, but it doesn't look easy! As for motivation- our initial bipedal videos were made by following the octopuses closely, so we interpreted the behavior as a form of escape (defense). This summer I went back for a closer look at the behavior and they also walked to cover open spaces.

    Don't worry that you haven't found anything about "bumping" - this seems to be a term that was made up for the TV program, and as far as I know is absent from the literature.
     
  19. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

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    Interesting -- thanks for the insight, right from the source!
     

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