New tank update (pics!)

Discussion in 'Tank Talk' started by John007h, Aug 14, 2010.

  1. John007h

    John007h Cuttlefish Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thought I'd post an update on my tank setup.

    Specs for people that haven't seen it:

    65 Gal.
    Eheim 2217 filter
    Excaliber protein skimmer
    100lbs of live rock
    30lbs live sand, 20lbs crush coral

    Enjoy the pics :)

    Also I got a great deal on the skimmer, 50 bucks, rated for 110 gal. is excaliber a good make?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Tested ammonia for the first time today, looking good after two weeks of cycling:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Pretty happy with it, couple months left before the octo :)
     
  2. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,076
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Look good! Just be sure the octopus doe not sneak out during the day and use the weight bench :sagrin:
     
  3. John007h

    John007h Cuttlefish Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    So I checked ammonia and nitrite and both are at 0 I take it that's a good sign for my first test. However my KH test came up as 7dh is that fine? I've heard a range of 8 to 12 is preferred how do I raise it? I have been using tap water with a dechlorinator, my tap water is realitively soft since the house was recently built in a new area. Thanks.
     
  4. John007h

    John007h Cuttlefish Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Tank mates

    Just updating my current setup.

    I purchased a lion fish at my LFS after ammonia and nitrite levels had dropped to 0 and stayed that way for two and a half weeks.

    He's been in there for a week and a half now and doing very well. I set up 5 gal feeder tank with a filter and power head, its keeping guppies.

    When I get the octo, should I trade the lionfish back in, he's currently 4 and 1/2 inches in size, or is it possible for them to get along?

    If not a lionfish, is the octo compatible with any tank mates at all, I have a lot of LR for hiding as you can see in the pics.

    Pic:
    [​IMG]
     
  5. rryyddeerr

    rryyddeerr Vampyroteuthis Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2010
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Northern NJ
  6. snowmaker

    snowmaker Vampyroteuthis Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Messages:
    296
    Likes Received:
    1
    I wouldn't worry about kH @ 7. Better it is stable there than to keep trying to chase it to 9 for instance.
    Before running a reactor, I would get kH, Ca, and Mg supplements from Bulk Reef Supply.
    http://www.bulkreefsupply.com/store/
    The sites calculator is very handy.
     
  7. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,076
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    My brain screams NO! but to be honest, I am not sure anyone has tried it. Going strictly by what I know of the two animals, I would say the lion would find the octo a tasty dinner and is protected by its spines from being an octo snack. Size plays an important roll in the predator/prey game but the poisonous spines of the lion may negate size reversals. One of the primary reasons REEF is so focused on the spread of lions in the Atlantic is it's varocious appetite and lack of controlling predators. Octopuses, from birth, are pretty much a marine menu item for most predators (humans included) so trying to put one in a predator tank would logically be preposterous. The infamous story about the Seattle aquarium's experiment with an environment that should provide enough space and hiding room to allow small sharks and a GPO to live together has been a popular video and more or less shows that inhibiting nature's mortal enemies is not simply a matter of keeping everyone well fed (they have learned to keep and release the Great Whites after the first one started eating its tank mates).

    You will have to make some decisions about what you expect from your aquarium. If you are new to marine tanks, then learn how to keep them traditionally and traditionally (a very short tradition in a very new field), octopuses belong in a species only tank. Once you have some experience with both octopuses and marine environments, you may wish to experiment but until you understand how to add, subtract, multiply and divide inventing a new math concept is out of the question.

    We recommend staying away from anything that packs a strong sting or can damage the octopuses skin. In the wild, octopuses will learn to avoid these but in a small environment, the octo has navagational issues and the stinging cells stay in the water column much longer. Any skin damage is an infection concern. I don't know of any in situ studies regarding infections and healing (perhaps the animals simply become food) but topical treatments are almost impossible to administer, water antibiotics will destory your natural filtration and QT tanks for an octopus are difficult to create. We have seen limited success with oral antibiotics but often an animal with an infection will stop eating before you can administer a treatment in its food (which will still put some of the antibiotic into the environment).

    Sooo, what CAN you safely put in a tank with an octopus? Most sofies (leather corals, kenya, some of the low stinging polyps) won't hurt the animal but need to be well fastened to the substrate (live rock is a substrate) and hardy enough to be "walked on". Brittle stars (greens being a suggested exception because of their aggression once they reach a about 10" in diameter), serpent stars, common starfish (there are concerns with the bahama star because of its style of eating), often peppermint shrimp will avoid capture but are an expensive meal if caught, snails (also sometimes eaten but harmless to the octo), hermit crabs (same as snails), sponges (hard to keep, avoid the red ball sponge), gorgonians (again care with placement is recommended) and pencil urchins (possibly pin cushion urchins. I have not kept the pin cusion urchins with mine but others seem to have success). Brittles and serpents are particularly enjoyable as they can often be hand fed. My basic "go by" is, "if it swims, avoid it unless you expect it to be food".

    Be sure to wear gloves while cleaning the tank. I have had the unfortunate experience of being aggressively attacked by an animal I raised from very young. The pain is worse than what you may have already heard and lasts a very long time. I happened to be stung in a finger joint and it was a full year before I had normal use of the finger. I was less than a minute away from the only antidote, scalding hot water.
     

Share This Page