nautilus conservation - action item

Discussion in 'The Octopus' Den' started by ceph, Sep 7, 2009.

  1. ceph

    ceph Wonderpus Staff Member Moderator

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    The US government is currently considering listing nautilus on CITES. Data and expert opinions are being solicited. If you can provide information, please send it to:

    Patricia S. De Angelis, Ph.D.
    Mail: Division of Scientific Authority, U.S. Fish and
    Wildlife Service, 4401 North Fairfax Drive, Room 110,
    Arlington, VA 22203
    E-mail: scientificauthority@fws.gov
    Fax: 703–358–2276



    ------------------------------------------------

    CITES COP15: ANNOUNCEMENT OF SPECIES
    PROPOSALS AND PROPOSED RESOLUTIONS,
    DECISIONS, AND AGENDA ITEMS BEING CONSIDERED
    BY THE UNITED STATES; OBSERVER INFORMATION
    Mollusks
    3. Nautilids (Allonautilus spp. and Nautilus spp.) –
    Inclusion in Appendix II
    HSUS and HSI recommended that the United States
    propose the genus Nautilus and the genus Allonautilus
    for inclusion in Appendix II because the species in these
    genera are slow-growing and late-maturing, with a low
    reproduction rate and low recovery potential, making
    them susceptible to overharvest. These species are
    native to western Pacific and Indo-Pacific coastal reefs,
    including the U.S. territory, American Samoa. Population
    declines have been reported in areas where intensive
    fisheries exist or have existed. The species appear to be
    unable to re-colonize localities from which they have
    been extirpated and captive breeding has not produced
    viable offspring beyond the hatchling stage.
    The primary threats to the Nautilidae family are
    commercial harvest and habitat loss or degradation
    throughout its range. The species are internationally
    traded as shell products, jewelry, unworked shell, trim,
    and live specimens, for the curio and tourist markets,
    and possibly for the aquarium and pet trade. More than
    579,000 specimens were imported into the United States
    between 2005 and 2008, reported mainly from the
    Philippines, Indonesia, and China. Approximately 99
    percent of these specimens are reported as wild-
    harvested. As the National Marine Fisheries Service
    (NMFS) continues to gather information from various
    external experts and agency staff, a preliminary analysis
    suggests that endemic species such as N. belauensis, N.
    stenomphalus, N. macromphalus, and N. repertus may
    be subject to overfishing and may warrant inclusion in
    Appendix II. Allonautilus are increasingly found for sale
    in Indonesia. Allonautilus (which is sympatric with N.
    pompilius in Papua New Guinea) is extremely rare and
    may warrant protection. More common species might be
    sustainably utilized if regulated locally.
    CITES could provide regulation of international trade,
    complementing national and local management. The
    United States is undecided about whether to propose
    these species for inclusion in Appendix II, pending
    consultations with range countries, and we seek
    additional information about the species’ biological and
    trade status to assist in our decision making.


    For more info, go to:
    http://www.fws.gov/international/newspubs/fedregnot_list.html

    For concerns about nautilus, see:
    http://www.thecephalopodpage.org/tentacle.php
    http://www.thecephalopodpage.org/nautcon.php


    --

    James B. Wood Ph.D.
    Director of Education
    Aquarium of the Pacific
    Long Beach, California
     

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