• TONMOCON VII Announced | MBL at Woods Hole | Apr 6-8, 2018
  • Thanks for visiting! TONMO is the world's greatest online cephalopod enthusiast community, with interactive content going back to May of 2000, and a biennial conference. If you'd like to join in on the fun, become a TONMO member -- it's easy and free. You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more cephy goodness.


Midwest Marine Conference

sedna

Larger Pacific Striped Octopus
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 13, 2008
Messages
1,099
Location
Livonia, MI
#1
Hello all! I have escaped the clutches of the PTA and JDRF long enough to post news that is now 2 weeks old... Anyway, our Michigan club had it's annual convention two weekends ago. I proudly wore my Tonmo.com t-shirt, and was noticed by one woman who keeps S. bandensis! Certainly no one spoke about ceph keeping, but there were some noteworthy things.

Jay Hemdal who is the curator of fishes and inverts at the Toledo Zoo was there talking about captive breeding. Any of you who read the liner notes in Nancy and Colin's book will recognize Jay's name. He has been keeping a GPO at their aquarium, and at the time of the conference, they were trying to decide whether or not to euthanize him. Their supplier has a 2 lb GPO now, in a couple of weeks when he's back in town I'll get an update and he's offered a behind the scenes tour. I told him a lot of us will be interested in the euthanization issue. More on that when I know...

Kevin Kohen of Live Aquaria. Com gave a talk about long and short distribution chains and responsible marine purchases. He had lots of pics of his facility, which is impressive. Even more impressive was his photos of the collection stations where he gets his stock from. Impressive because HE'S ACTUALLY VISITED those places and knows how the livestock is caught, handled and shipped. I bugged him about an octo and he put me at the top of his list... Based on this guy's knowledge and information, I'd totally give Live Aquaria a try!

Richard Pyle was on hand to talk about diving in the twilight zone- between 165 and 500 ft. Super interesting guy, learned all about re-breathers and such. What an incredible diversity of life in this zone that we know so little about! On every dive they find new species of fish. Makes me wonder how many more cephs are hiding out there!
 

Members online

No members online now.