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MAR-ECO Research Cruise

Tintenfisch

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#1
:periscop:

Having been offline for what feels like years, I'll now drop in again for about a week... during the CIAC Symposium, I was offered the chance to join an upcoming MAR-ECO research expedition to the South Atlantic! Good stuff: (other than the obvious going to sea for five weeks and looking at really cool stuff as it comes up :heee:): I'm working on a couple of groups with little reported material from this area; it will be my first time on a proper researchy-type ship (and what a ship it is!); and I kind of like the ocean a little bit. Not so good stuff: I will have been back from the previous trip less than three weeks and will leave the day before our first anniversary. :hmm:
We will depart from Las Palmas (Canaries) on 25 October and return into Cape Town on 30 November, zig-zagging our way down the mid-Atlantic Ridge (I believe) and stopping at ten planned stations for nine samples each (three each benthic, midwater and surface). Still working out the exact plan for processing ceph specimens - I have wish lists from about five people so far. :roll:
Not sure how much web access there will be once we depart, but hopefully email at least, so I can send Steve updates!

:boat:
 

Nancy

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#3
What a wonderful opportunity! Nice ship, too! Am looking forward to your reports (emails to Steve, at least) and to lots of interesting photos!

Nancy
 

DWhatley

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#4
Awsome! Just AWSOME!!!

I am not so sure about the gift shop :confused: and all the talk about ice :rolleyes: (We need a polar cepth smiley for you and Greg now).
 

gjbarord

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#5
Sounds great!! Looking at that ship makes me not want to get back on my little boats. Have fun!!

Greg
 

Tintenfisch

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#8
Thanks, I will do my best to send some reports here while I'm on board! Assuming we don't :sink: ...
 

DWhatley

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#9
It would be a rather unfortunate event if you happened to prove that there are squid/octos that could sink ships. Always wear your camera so if we find you it can be published that you were the first to film it live. :sagrin:
 

DWhatley

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#10
For anyone who has not found it, I went looking for news of Tintenfisch and found the Akademik Ioffe (her ship) journal for this trip.

No whales were sighted today, but hundreds of flying fish have leapt and glided away from the ship's hull (Kat caught one of them in mid-air in this beautiful photo).
 

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Tintenfisch

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#12
Hi guys! Wow, things have changed around here...
The cruise was good fun and there were lots of interesting little cephs to play with. I'll post some photos here soon (after I work out the new format maybe :wink:); I'm also finally getting some posted on my blog (thanks for the link above, Monty). We got ~270 specimens, 44 species from 22 families in total, 25% of which were cranchiids. Also a few onychos, enoplos and histios, gelatinous octos, and some single individuals of rarer stuff like Neoteuthis and Vampyroteuthis. Plenty of stuff to work on now that I'm back!
 

OB

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#13
Welcome back, Kat :smile:
 

Tintenfisch

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#15
And here are some cranchiids. Bearing in mind that the family is in serious need of revision and ID of juvenile specimens is provisional as best, we think we have (in order): Galiteuthis armata, Liocranchia reinhardti, and Cranchia scabra. The final one is a small ommastrephid that we also got at most stations but haven't ID'd to species yet.
 

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Tintenfisch

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#16
Here are some non-ceph but still very cool things. The first is what our catches normally looked like - the fish team would sort out their beasts first and pass the rest on to us. We pulled out all the cephs, ID'd and fixed them, and fixed the rest (crustaceans, jellies, salps, pteropods, etc) for someone else to look at later back on shore. The remaining photos are hatchetfish (also common), the barrel-shrimp Phronima (hollows out salps to live in, pretty cool), and a deep-sea ?viperfish caught mid-snack.
 

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DWhatley

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#17
Interesting bright red shrimp. They look too bright to be peppermint shrimp but are they? Are there any shallow water cranchiids? Is the one with the green background still alive?
 

bluespotocto

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#18
How did you collect every thing? Did you dive?

Not sure where to match the name with the fish but what is the black fish with the little thing on his heads name? It looks like the fish from finding nemo!
 

OB

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#19
That Pterygioteuthis is marvelous, a "gem" indeed :wink: Relatively unscathed, considering the harvesting technique, but I take it the hatchet fish lost their tails that way?
 

Tintenfisch

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#20
These were collected with an Isaacs-Kidd Midwater Trawl (IKMT), which is pretty fine-meshed, a few hundred microns I believe. It was deployed either to the scattering layer(s) or to a set depth, usually 1000 or 2000m. Most of the stuff came in in pretty good condition, and many of the cephs were still alive (barely). Those we kept, if still active when caught, were gradually euthanized in ethanol before being fixed in formalin. By the end of the cruise, we got a few still-healthy individiuals from taxa we already had well represented, so we were able to release a few. I think the black fish is a kind of viperfish but I'm not sure... the Russians called it something else. :wink:
And there aren't any shallow-dwelling cranchiids that I can think of off-hand. I'll post a few more pics later today - there were some mighty strange-looking ones! Angel Perez, the other squid guy, mentioned that cranchiids are supposed to be the dominant ceph fauna in relatively nutrient-poor environments, which I found interesting. (And Meso might be an exception, as usual?)
 

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