Little Omani Cuttlefish | The Octopus News Magazine Online
  • Thanks for visiting! TONMO is the world's greatest online cephalopod enthusiast community, with interactive content going back to May of 2000, and a biennial conference. If you'd like to join in on the fun, become a TONMO member -- it's easy and free. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more cephy goodness.

Little Omani Cuttlefish

Hajar

Haliphron Atlanticus
Registered
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
540
#1
Greetings all.

Can anybody identify this little (roughly 10 cm) cuttlefish? It was in very shallow water at low tide near the Oman Dive Centre close to Muscat.

Apologies for the poor images (two are stills from video). There are dark and light transverse bands on the mantle and an abundance of tubercles. When we were face to face it raised two tentacles to me.

I think the large cuttlefish we see in the supermarkets here are Sepia pharaonis, but this little animal looks very different.

Grateful for your help.
 

Attachments

Hajar

Haliphron Atlanticus
Registered
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
540
#3
Thank you for that!

Excellent to see the variety of cephalopods living in the local sea. I couldn't identify my cuttlefish from the various Sepia illustrations, but will start to look out for different cuttlebones on the beach. I have just one in the house right now, collected for comparison with this fossil http://rusmithsgallery.fotopic.net/p58047870.html.
 

OB

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
3,086
#5
S. latimanus gets fairly big, so yours would have been a juvenile, hard to tell from the pictures, they're so versatile in their presentation; just look at this one mesmerizing an intended prey (lure in this case).

 

OB

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
3,086
#7
They call it "passing cloud", fairly common, actually, amongst cephalopods, check out little Flamboyant walking over the seafloor, happily passing its cloud :smile:

 

DWhatley

Certified Ceph Head For Life
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,006
Location
Gainesville, GA
#8
O! B!
happily passing its cloud
:tomato:

If you get the opportunity to photograph more, one of the physical elements that seems to be diagnostic is the shape of the eye (iris) so getting a clear, close picture may provide a better clue than any coloration or other body part. taking pictures of the aquarium residence, I find I see a lot more in some of my photos than what I observed at the moment of taking the picture so just targeting the eye and shooting away might produce more than you would think. These little guys are so tiny though, that I am not sure there is any possible id at this point. Have you gone back to see if the appear territorial?
 

Hajar

Haliphron Atlanticus
Registered
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
540
#9
Thank you Ob! That is fascinating, astonishing and also very entertaining to watch.

"D", I'll take better pictures next time and look them in the eyes. This one was alone and very well camouflaged until he moved. We see lots of juvenile fish (especially butterfly,damsel, sergeant majors, goatfish, groupers, some rays and morays), in the shallows so I would guess this little cuttlefish was a juvenile too. There are no mangroves in this bay, but there are in nearby bays (Qurum where I live and Bandar Khairan) and these must be great environments for the juveniles to hide in.
 

Hajar

Haliphron Atlanticus
Registered
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
540
#10
I went for a swim after work today and spent a good long while watching these two adults. Awesome. There was quite a lot of conversation going on between the two of them - partly through touch and partly through colour changes. Can anyone put a name to this species?
 

Attachments

CaptFish

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 9, 2009
Messages
2,833
Location
South Florida
#11
Cool! How big were they?
 

CaptFish

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 9, 2009
Messages
2,833
Location
South Florida
#13
Woah, they're huge! I thought you were going to say a few centimeters. Thanks for sharing I have no idea what they would be, but i'm sure an expert will be along shortly.
 

Hajar

Haliphron Atlanticus
Registered
Joined
Mar 7, 2009
Messages
540
#14
Yes, they were very impressive. I floated just above them for about 15 to 20 minutes. I'm struggling with a video editor to make a snippet with a file size small enough to load here.
 

CaptFish

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jul 9, 2009
Messages
2,833
Location
South Florida
#15
The videos on TONMO dont work work right now you need to use youtube or photobucket
 

OB

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Oct 19, 2003
Messages
3,086
#17
They're all the same couple, Rich :wink: That blue lining gets me, what beauty!
 

DWhatley

Certified Ceph Head For Life
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,006
Location
Gainesville, GA
#18
I was wondering if that fluorescent blue ring would be diagnostic AND if it would suggest toxicity.
 

Thales

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 22, 2004
Messages
2,998
#20
dwhatley;161968 said:
I was wondering if that fluorescent blue ring would be diagnostic AND if it would suggest toxicity.
Diagnostic I think yes, but not toxic. I have a group of S pharaonis at home (yes I know, I should take some pics) and they show that ring when excited or striking food. Interestingly, these guys are way different from S. bandensis - much more active, aggressive, and they hoard food!
 

Members online

No members online now.

Monty Awards

TONMOCON IV: Terri
TONMOCON V: Jean
TONMOCON VI: Taollan
TONMOCON VII: ekocak

About the Monty Awards