Larger species recommendations?

Jabba954

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#1
So, my living room 225 gallon tank had a little disaster about 2 months ago (upstairs toilet overflowed after it had been cleaned, with bleach, dripped down into the tank... killing all inhabitants except the 4 eels). So the four eels were moved to my BIG shark/ray tank, and I cleaned out the living room tank - and moved it - now it's been sitting/cycling for the last six weeks with no inhabitants.

I want to do an octopus tank, but it's a fairly large tank, and I'd rather not have a small octopus in there (since it will be the only critter in there, aside from other inverts that I'm alright with becoming octopus lunch). Preferably something that reaches 20-24" across. I've reinforced the lids, with the anticipation of adding an octo, and the tank is ready to go.

So what species do you guys suggest? Or would two of the smaller species be ok in that tank? Thanks,

J
 

CaptFish

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#2

Jabba954

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#3
VERY cool. I've got my LFS keeping an eye out for bimacs and briareus for me. I'm amazed you kept the tangs in there for as long as you did. My tangs that I couldn't catch in my big tank ended up shark food VERY quickly.
 

CaptFish

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#4
I left her tank mates in there until I saw her hunting them. I got most out safely but she got a few.
 

DWhatley

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#5
Here is another discussion on larger octopuses that can be considered, briareus being the most common but with the recent record colds, many be harder to find in the spring (deeper water animals were effected less).
 

Neogonodactylus

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#8
If I were looking for a large octopus to keep in a very large aquarium, I would choose O. cyanea because:

1. It gets large. Mantle length of 7 inches; arm length of over two feet.

2. It is diurnal and active using a diversity of hunting techniques.

3. It uses a variety of shape, texture and color patterns as camouflage and for displays.

4. Probably because it often is found in shallow water, it is tolerant over a fair range of temperatures and salinities.

5. It is one of the most common large octopuses in the world found on reefs from Hawaii and French Polynesia to East Africa.

6. At most locations where it is found, it is not threatened - although it is often eaten.

7. It accepts a wide variety of live prey from fish to crustaceans and mollusks. I have even seen one capture and kill an 18 inch green turtle.

8. They live at least a year. The longest I have kept one in captivity is 15 months, but I suspect that at cool temperatures and moderate feeding they live longer.

Negatives:

1. They are very prone to inking and produce massive amounts of ink.

2. They bite.

3. To be suitable for the aquarium trade, suppliers should catch juveniles - which are difficult to find. I've had the most luck collecting young animals from coral rubble at moderate depths 10-30 m. I'm not sure if they settle deeper and move up onto shallow reefs as they mature, but it is a possibility.


Here are images of a 1 cm juvenile that I caught last summer on Moorea. Note the false eye spot characterized by the physical ring and bump in the center.

Roy
 

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Jabba954

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#9
Very cool - thank you very much.

I've asked my shark supplier, who often catches sharks and rays in Hawaii, to look for juvies for me (and from reading on here about them, seems a great many ppl would be interested in one, were they readily available)
 

DWhatley

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#11
:cry::cry::cry:I sooo want to try a cyanea but the one tank I have that might be suitable (140 pent) is not octo available and I am still not working. The not working part excludes the ability to convert the aquarium, doable in a day or two of concentrated effort, in addition to the purchase I'm afraid.
 

Omega

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#12
He has several juveniles coming in? let me know the price!
 

Jabba954

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#13
He told me $325 each, with mantels about 2" across (he said golfball sized). I thought that was a bit expensive, but that likely includes his shipping from Hawaii to California. He dives/collects in Hawaii ~once a month. He's holding one for me, and I'm supposed to pick it up monday.
 

Omega

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#14
seems expensive but since there arnt a steady source i suppose you have to pay for oddities. I have to ask though..are you sure he's collecting the right species? It seems like everyone always has a hard time Identifying what species an octo is. It'd suck to get something that isnt a Cynea if you pay so much for it.
 

CaptFish

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#16
:shock: holy cow that's really expensive!!!
 

Omega

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#17
i was thinking...thats really expensive for an octopus that usually ends up hacked into pieces for bait.
 

Jabba954

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#18
I suppose it's simply a matter of supply and demand. He typically is fairly high on prices, but he gets a lot of exotic sharks and rays. He seemed pretty certain of the species. I'll see monday, before paying.

My preferred LFS (Aquarium Concepts in Dublin, CA) gets various species once in a while, and they're typically ~$40, and I have a standing order for a pair - as well as mate for my shovelnose guitarfish. Coolest ray ever.

I'm going down to SoCal in a few weeks to a spot my buddy says he sees octopus whenever he dives, and it's open for fishing - so I'm going to dive and see if I can't catch a pair of Bimacs. The tank can easily be converted to cold water (has a monster chiller on the system, and nobody else will be living there, as the eels will go to my big tank).
 

CaptFish

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#19
FYI- unless they are meratoris a pair of octos in the same tank is not recommended
 

DWhatley

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#20
If they are found close together, they may be fine. Bimacs are the only other species we have on record as living peacfully with sibblings but we really don't know what happened as they grew up since the member who raised them went off to college and his dad did not keep contact. We do know that there was a tank mating but that is the end of the reporting.
 

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