Just starting, need some opinions and help please :)se

Discussion in 'Octopus Care' started by awoj1812, Feb 25, 2009.

  1. awoj1812

    awoj1812 Larval Mass Registered

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    I am very interested in purchasing my first pet cephalopod this summer. i know i want to buy an octopus, however im not 100% sure which species i should get? O. bimaculoides, or O. vulgaris, i heard make better pets, thought im still not quite sure which would be best. I plan on researching this much more before purchasing and would love to hear what other people interested in these amazing creatures have to say! :grin:
     
  2. corw314

    corw314 Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

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    First,:welcome: Second read...read...and read some more! The book on Octopuses Nancy and Colin wrote is an awesome way to begin research not to mention the tons of info on this site! O'Vulgaris you need over 100 gal tank if not more like a 200. They get big! I favor the 2 spot bimaculotis and there used to be captive bred available but not sure what is out there now. Have you ever had any experience with saltwater tanks?
     
  3. Tintenfisch

    Tintenfisch Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Hi there, and :welcome:

    Yep, reading a lot is definitely the way to go - check out the book as Carol suggested, and also the many articles here. Happy researching :smile:
     
  4. Animal Mother

    Animal Mother Architeuthis Supporter

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    Welcome to TONMO!

    As the others said, the information in the articles and forums on this website is priceless and there is plenty to read that will answer most of your questions. The book also mentioned is extremely valuable to a potential ceph-keeper.

    Most important is being able to first maintain a saltwater tank. The tank is like an animal all its own and you will need to know how to maintain it and keep your water parameters balanced. After that, the hardest thing will be feeding the animal you get. Sometimes they decide they just won't eat dead stuff and you'll have a hefty bill on your hands if that's the case.

    O. hummelincki, O. briareus, Abdopus aculeatus, and apparently an O. macropus complex species seem to be the most commonly available in the USA right now. Avoid anything labeled or described as "Rare".

    Take your time. Patience is the biggest part of this hobby. Good luck! And welcome to your new addiction.
     
  5. awoj1812

    awoj1812 Larval Mass Registered

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    Thanks guys :) , ha its definitely becoming a new addiction quickly! I plan on doing this with a few of my friends here at UNE in maine. One of these kids has a pretty big tank and used to own an octopus himself a couple years ago. A few of these friends are marine biology majors and have had numerous salt water tanks themselves, i plan on learning a lot from them on how to set up and maintain a saltwater tank before adding my octopus. I've been reading and am amazed b what i learn each day, its such a cool hobby to have and i cant wait to learn more and get more and more into it! Thanks for all the help, now its my time to begin my research!
     

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