JellyFish as a pet

Discussion in 'Octopus Care' started by joreed3, Feb 13, 2006.

  1. joreed3

    joreed3 Cuttlefish Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Is it possible..??
     
  2. William Tyson

    William Tyson Vampyroteuthis Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2005
    Messages:
    410
    Likes Received:
    4
    yes. there is a sponsor on Reefcentral.com that sells them i forgot the name though
     
  3. joreed3

    joreed3 Cuttlefish Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    where did you buy your cuttle eggs from ..?
     
  4. alexmaymir

    alexmaymir Pygmy Octopus Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2006
    Messages:
    14
    Likes Received:
    0
    i heard that they seldom survive in home aquariums for longer than two weeks, they're very likely to drift near a high power filter and lose their tentacles or some other necessary appendage.
     
  5. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2002
    Messages:
    3,986
    Likes Received:
    6
    It is possible to keep cassiopeia but you'll need a krysler tank to do it properly... keeps them in suspension so to speak... i think that moon jellys are most commonly seen for sale

    cheers
     
  6. Scouse

    Scouse Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2003
    Messages:
    525
    Likes Received:
    0
    I saw some in an aquarium in South England last year that was about 1metre by 1 metre. The guide post next to the tank said they needed circular flow to keep in capitivity (from memory) but it just looked like they were in a washing machine to me!!

    Some kept spinning and rolling round without being able to swim properly didnt look like fun from where I was.

    What are you doin...buildin a breeder tank for a giant squid?!?!? :lol:
     
  7. Andy Lister

    Andy Lister Vampyroteuthis Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2004
    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    0
    Cass seem to do better in a fairly shallow tank with little water movement from what ive experienced as they have a similar symbiotic algae similar to that of hard corals and as such have to photosynthesize. They are called upside-down jellyfish so that the tentacles will have maximum exposure to the light. Therefore they will also need quite a lot of light... unfortunatly they do much much better in a dirty tank. I've got the irritating situation of having millions of polyps in my tank and about 30 ephyrae (babies) blibbing around my tank at any one time. If you have them feed them a mix of coral food, metal halide lighting and newly hatched artemia.

    For pelagic jellies you'd definatly need a krysal tank however which is the washing machine design which Scouse described.

    ~Andy
     
  8. TidePool Geek

    TidePool Geek O. vulgaris Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2005
    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Jo,

    Because jellyfish are such weak swimmers they should be thought of as
    plankton. I think that the only way to keep one for any length of time
    is in a specialized tank called a Kreisel, which is a circular tank
    with a circumrotating current that prevents the animals from becoming
    trapped against obstructions. Do Google searches on "Kreisel tank" and
    "Kriesel tank" (note misspelling) for more information.

    There are a couple of other problems to think about:

    1. Lifespan - Most jellies of a size appropriate for a home aquarium
    are quite short lived. Don't be surprised if they die after only a
    month or so. [The Moon jellies already mentioned have a total lifespan
    of about a year in cold (10C) water, probably a good deal less in
    warmer water. Plus, you really won't know how old they are when you
    get them.]

    2. Food - Jellies of the appropriate type mainly eat zooplankton.
    Copepods would be best but, since they don't live long anyway, you
    might be able to get by with enriched brine shrimp.

    Comb jellies (Ctenophores) are another possibility. They seem to be a
    bit longer lived than jellyfish but are probably harder to feed since
    they are smaller than jellyfish and have a more 'delicate' apparatus
    for catching their food. We've kept these guys in our flow through
    Kreisel quite successfully but I really have no idea what it is that
    they eat exactly. Brine shrimp would be far too big and I even wonder
    whether a ctenophore could subdue an adult copepod.


    Planktonically yours,

    Alex
     
  9. cuttlegirl

    cuttlegirl Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2005
    Messages:
    4,891
    Likes Received:
    236
    Location:
    Pittsburgh, PA
  10. chrono_war01

    chrono_war01 Colossal Squid Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2004
    Messages:
    2,580
    Likes Received:
    4
    Jellyfish are very very brittle animals, it's even harder than trying to keep a ceph, in my opinon, I've kept a few jellies before, a upside down jelly lived for half a year before dying of a unknown cuase. But moon-jellies are hard! The best is to forget the powerheads and such and try to keep a single one in a salad bowl, that's how I got the best result...which was sadly still only two weeks.
     
  11. Graeme

    Graeme Vampyroteuthis Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2005
    Messages:
    352
    Likes Received:
    1
    To be honest, I dunno why anyone would want to keep a jelly... Ceph's yeah, but I can't see the attraction with keeping plankton in a tank. They won't do much more than bob in the water column. But then that's just me...

    Graeme
     
  12. Tturtle

    Tturtle Larval Mass Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2008
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Have you seen a movie called Bright Future? In that movie a pet jellyfish if featured. I know it's just a movie, but it seemed really cool until I started reading up on the reality of having a pet jellyfish.
     
  13. monty

    monty Colossal Squid Staff Member Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    Messages:
    4,887
    Likes Received:
    11
    :welcome: to TONMO... have you considered a pet octopus instead? :grin:
     
  14. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,078
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    We got very excited at the idea when our aquarium opened and had a great display but about 10 hours of research killed the idea. I even wrote to a diver collector in the keys about obtaining an "upside down" jelly that is very common there and his take was that they lived only a short time, would kill anything else in a tank (as they do in the wild where they take over) and would foul the tank for anything else in the process. There is a site I saw recently that is, however, selling them if you want to give it a go. I can't find their online store link but they also have an eBay presence:

    http://stores.ebay.com/Reef-Scaveng...0QQcolZ4QQdirZ1QQfsubZ124318119QQftidZ2QQtZkm
     
  15. Animal Mother

    Animal Mother Architeuthis Supporter

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2006
    Messages:
    2,364
    Likes Received:
    7
    They're cheap, so it wouldn't be a terrible investment, but yeah, very hard to keep. We considered turning our hex tank into a jelly tank since circular movement in the tank wouldn't be hard to accomplish. That tank kept busting seals though so we blew off that idea.
     
  16. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,078
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    AM,
    We were also going to use a hex tank (albeit 4' tall and only about 12" dia) until we decided against it. Not only are the impressive ones hard to get, are not at all suited to an aquarium, they only live a short time.
     
  17. marinebio_guy

    marinebio_guy Vampyroteuthis Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2004
    Messages:
    351
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Ocean Springs, Mississippi
    Having worked with jellyfish before I can say they are difficult to keep not only do most need a specially designed tank that has to be "tuned in" so you get the right flow/movement but almost all require live food such as artemia, rotifers and a lot of the species are feed chopped up jellyfish that's enriched with various additives. The Mangrove jellyfish would be one of the easest to keep as they do not need the kreisel but would need high lighting and still some live food or you might me able to squirt frozen food to them. But in general jellyfish do not do to well in captivity they evetually get too bet up by running into the sides of the tank and die.
     
  18. marineboy

    marineboy Wonderpus Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2005
    Messages:
    184
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well I did a small amount of research and apparently if you are willing to throw down a couple thousand or so you can purchase jelly-specific cages which are very much like the ones you might see at an aquarium exhibit.

    here's just one that I found: http://www.jelliquarium.com/

    this site features many different jelly fish set-ups, all of which are RIDICULOUSLY overpriced and dont seem to reliable. However, I did find a Cassiopeia specific aquarium for 1,560$ which would be the same if you had seen it at your LFS (considering how much of a rip-off they are).
     
  19. Thales

    Thales Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2004
    Messages:
    2,996
    Likes Received:
    69
    Do you have links about the reliability of jelliquarium stuff?
     
  20. Octavarium

    Octavarium Wonderpus Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2008
    Messages:
    235
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    East Haven,CT

Share This Page