[Octopus]: Itza - Octopus maya

Carmen22

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Featured Thread #21
Thank you for all your input, I’m so glad to have this forum for support and information. Itza and the orange little star are getting along just great! The star is in movement all the time which is quite entertaining for me, also I can feed Itza more an leave uneaten pellets and later they are gone, so I guess the star gets the left overs? I hope so... here a picture of the orange star looking for food in Itza’s today den and Itza didn’t mind at all ⭐️ 1B5AAA33-7CC5-4B84-B593-089DE51E944B.jpeg
 

Carmen22

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#22
Itza is not eating since yesterday ... she takes the pellets and “spit” them back to me ...is this normal? Water is fine, she seems happy and playful as always but she doesn’t want food
Also her “ocelo” is very noticeable now, the maya is also known as the 4 eyes octopus because of this

C7B455A5-E5F4-4A96-9ACF-C265CCD6EE73.jpeg
 

DWhatley

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#23
Not eating is not a good sign. Showing her eyespot a lot also worries me but we have not had a journalled maya. In O.bimaculoides @Nancy has mentioned that they show their eyespot when they eat or are excited. With O. hummelincki I find they rarely show theirs unless they are upset. I would do a large water change just in case she has inked when you were not there and because you do not have very much biological filtration and she is growing. I would also offer a piece of thawed table shrimp to see if she needs larger food as this is what they would do in nature.
 

Carmen22

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#24
Thank you DWhatley I also asked Dr. Rosas who is the lead researcher in Sisal ... he gave me the same advice about the water and also told me this: We must remember that octopuses consume food according to the phases of growth: hyperplasia and hyperopia...(not sure about the translation) when they are in hyperplasia they stop eating for several days, Itza is 4 months old so it’s very likely that she’s is in a hyperplasia phase.
I will do a water change and try other foods and let you know how it goes.
 

Dana Ritterbusch

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#25
Thank you DWhatley I also asked Dr. Rosas who is the lead researcher in Sisal ... he gave me the same advice about the water and also told me this: We must remember that octopuses consume food according to the phases of growth: hyperplasia and hyperopia...(not sure about the translation) when they are in hyperplasia they stop eating for several days, Itza is 4 months old so it’s very likely that she’s is in a hyperplasia phase.
I will do a water change and try other foods and let you know how it goes.

I’m so glad the scavenger hunt led me here. This is fascinating info!
 

DWhatley

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#26
octopuses consume food according to the phases of growth: hyperplasia and hyperopia...(not sure about the translation) when they are in hyperplasia they stop eating for several days,
I was not aware of a stop eating phase but the transition in rate of growth is familiar. They also start eating larger foods at this new stage, which is why I suggested trying shrimp.
 

Nancy

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#27
Good advice, and you might consider offering some small live food to her as well. Very small crabs or live shrimp. It.’s a form of enrichment for an octopus to hunt food.

Nancy
 

Carmen22

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#34
Hi everyone, thank you so much for asking Itza is great and I have 2 new octopuses of different ages now, we are trying to figure out the best age to sell them; I am also getting 2 new octopuses this week to see if they can live together, (since all of this research is part of a project to make having an octopus as a pet a possibility not just eat them) I am making a guide and I have to cover all possibilities, I am quite scared of putting two octopuses in the same tank, but they’re all together in the farm, do you know if this is possible in a fish tank?





4F6359AA-CA5D-4AB6-841C-8FE4A1E9F704.jpeg 20E07FD9-F6CA-4F6B-A365-F32B1C86512B.jpeg
 

DWhatley

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#35
:tentacle:PLEASE DO update on how the housing of two together works out. Soooo jealous of your opportunity!

We have raised 3 species on TONMO. The most difficult has been O. briareus and they are definitely cannibalistic and cannot be house together after about 1 month (possible less). O. mercatoris (dwarf, Caribbean) has done well with multiple siblings even in a relatively small tank. O. bimaculoides also seems to be able to be raised in small numbers together in a large tank but I only know of one instance where this was successfully tried. All successes have been with siblings but size and time of introduction may be more important than relationship. O. vulgaris has also been kept in very large tanks together with varying results of predation. Any attempts we have seen of even keeping different species in a common tank but separated have resulted in aggression and death.

What is the possibility of selling the pelletized food you are using? Is it also being fed as the only food to adults on the farm?
 

DWhatley

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#37
I don't think it is possible to avoid bristle worms, especially with Caribbean live rock. They are often considered cleanup crew but are also considered an unavoidable nuscience. They are not typically a problem for healthy animals but there concern for young and senescent octos. They will detect the deteriorating flesh of dying animals and start "cleaning up". I move my senescent octos to a suspended breeder net to live out their last days when I see the worms beginning to settle on the animal.

A word of caution, do not remove/touch them with your bare hands as those hairs (bristles) will embed in your fingers and can be painful until they finally make their way out of your skin (voice of tank cleaning experiences ;) )
 

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