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interested in doing a dive

BIGMAINELOBSTER

Larval Mass
Registered
Joined
Dec 4, 2012
Messages
3
#1
I live in michigan, and I am a student but I may be taking a 1 semester break or all online classes and I am very interested in doing a dive to observe\interact with octos.

does anyone know where the closest good place for that would be to michigan? also what sort of things will I need to do beforehand, I assume lots of people here are experienced divers, I've done some minimal diving in my life in a pool when it was offered through my old highschool so I am familiar but I don't know much about if you need lessions or a permit or something like that, also are there places that rent suits and gear? if not how much is the bare minimum cost for the equipment and are thre any good places I can get stuff used?

are there any divers that live here in michigan and dive around here?
 

Joe-Ceph

Haliphron Atlanticus
Supporter
Joined
Sep 25, 2006
Messages
555
#2
There's a lot to learn about SCUBA diving (certification training classes, equipment, location specific stuff) Call a dive shop, or Google SCUBA diving to answer all of those questions. It generally takes time, money, hassle, and a little risk to SCUBA dive, but you can stay underwater a long time compared to holding your breath. Don't skip the training - SCUBA diving can kill you if you do it wrong.

Freediving is diving without scuba gear, just holding your breath (snorkeling). It's cheaper, safer, fast and easy to learn, and involves a lot less hassle than SCUBA diving. I've done a lot of both, but I've done a lot more "observing and interacting with octos" by keeping one in an aquarium at home, or by finding them under rocks at low tide, or even going to a public aquarium and watching them through the glass. It takes some knowledge, and luck, to find octopus in the wild. If it's your dream goal to play with wild octopus underwater, then go for it (SCUBA if you can afford it, otherwise freediving/snorkeling).

Obviously you'll need to travel to an ocean to find wild octopus, so you might be looking at travel and housing costs. Maybe you can get a job at a "Sport Challet" in Southern California or Florida, or Hawaii, or Puerto Rico, get an employee discount on scuba classes, and find a cheap place to live for a few months. You can make an adventure out of it, just pick a place where you know there are plenty of octopus to find.
 

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