Impulse Octo Buy Journal

Discussion in 'ID Requests' started by Jack_Lucas, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    Hello all!

    My name is Jack!

    Been an aquarist for a long time. But after my divorce, i moved from florida to ny and left my 170 gallon and many other small aquariums behind...

    for the past month ive been getting a small aquarium ready, no fish only 6 hermit crabs, some live sand, some live rock...

    well today all that changed, I just received a baby octo! Its acclimating in the tank now, will probably only do a 45 min acclimation. Have the lights off...

    any idea on the species?

     

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  2. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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  3. Teacher Kim

    Teacher Kim GPO Registered

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    According to my clock it's 8:30 right now. Hope you read this before you let octopus loose. I would definitely acclimate much longer than 45 min. The staff on this site is great and will help you out a lot. Until you hear from them, I'd look in the octopus care section and see what you can find on acclimating octos. Hope he does great!! T Kim
     
  4. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    thanks kim. any idea on the species? ill try for better pics.

    but the water in the bag is whats concerning me
     
  5. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    the octo keeps climbing above the water line in the bag and staying there...

     

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  6. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    after one hour of acclimating to the water temp. i have moved the octo to a styrofoam box i lined with plastic. drip acclimating for the next hour?

     

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  7. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    Just arrived today any help on species?



     

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  8. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    Ok after around 3 hours of acclimation the octo is in the tank. He immediately swam into a hole in one of the live rocks and is there. I can see him with a flashlight. Lights are off.
     
  9. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    Ok after around 3 hours of acclimation the octo is in the tank. He immediately swam into a hole in one of the live rocks and is there. I can see him with a flashlight. Lights are off.
     
  10. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    so i had dropped a red feeder crab into the tank while I was acclimating, and I had not seen the crab since figured he hid and would not be heard from again for a while... I went out to dinner left the tank lights off... when I got home, I used my red light to look at the octo and low and behold, he had the red feeder crab in his grasp and was slowly devouring it! Now somehow when I was gone, the octo must of left his hole and stalked around for that crab... I take it this is a decent sign of acclimation?

     

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    DWhatley likes this.
  11. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    he ate the crab and literally jettisoned the empty shell out of the hole!! LOL
     
  12. Teacher Kim

    Teacher Kim GPO Registered

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    That's great!! Glad you saw him eat. Just in case you aren't aware, octopuses are fantastic escape artists, so make sure your tank is sealed tight! Also, keep a close watch on your water quality. I'm on my second octopus and am still learning a lot! One of the big questions when trying to ID one is where it came from. Did they tell you anything about that when you purchased it?
     
  13. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    :welcome: Jack

    Unfortunately the photos are not too helpful so lets start the, "What Species Am I" game with as much as you can remember from the purchase and acclimation.

    1. Do you know the body of water that it inhabited before capture? This helps a lot to narrow the species
    2. Can you give a guestimate of the mantle:arm ratio?
    3. What colors did you see it display?
    4. Are the eye on a well established "Y" shaped stalk or sitting close to the body so they look more independent than on a "Y"?
    5. Do you see any identifiable markings under the eyes (particularly a round circle on either side of the web) or else where?
    6. Do you see any color on the siphon?
    7. Do you see any color at the tips of the suckers?

    IF this is a Caribbean animal, I'll take a wild guess that it is O. mercatoris, a nocturnal dwarf. My reasons for this guess are the red color, what appears to be short arms (roughly 1:2.5 mantle:arm length) and the posture shown in the third photo. The arm (or both L1 and R1) between the eyes is a typical merc pose but I have seen very young animals of other species present that defense (but only mercs as adults). You can find some of the merc journals by going to the advanced search and searching titles only for the word: mercatoris.

    If it is a merc, I have found that this species particularly likes to den in giant purple barnacles placed about 1/3 of the way up the water column (by embedding in the live rock). If you will place a small cluster of these at that level where you can view the openings, you will have a better chance of seeing the animal on a regular basis. Most mercs are not very active or interactive but I enjoy keeping the species and have raised a couple from hatchling.

    KEEP IN MIND THIS IS A SWAG based on not anywhere near enough information :grin:. I only offer it because I know how frustrating it is when no one will even give a suggestion to research.

    Jack, Doubleposting is frowned upon. Not only is volunteer staff time extended but answers and conversations become disjoint with multiple threads on the same subject so I merged the two threads on this little one. Once we assign an ID or mark it unknown and you give it a name, I hope you will journal it and we can move it to the journals forum.
     
  14. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    Thanks for the forums etiquette tip...

    Dropped another red feeder crab in there, and it still lives.

    The octo has found a good den that I can see it if I flash a light in. the Octo looks healthy for now! water params are perfect, and I plan on continuing my weekly 25% water change. I'm using Catalina Real Ocean Water by the way for my changes.

    it was labeled as "Bali Octopus"

    The likelihood is that its a juvenile vulgaris?


     
  15. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    If you can see it in its den, watch for the same pose I referenced with one or both of the front two arms between the eyes and up over the head.
     
  16. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    Yeah "D" its doing exactly that pose in the den. looks almost like a coin pressed against the rock...

    When I flashed the light it immediately reacted. changing colors, still in its muted reddish brown range...

    Also when I look at Mercatoris on the web I definitely see the resemblance.

    If it were this species are you suggesting that it could be nearing adult?
     
  17. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    here is a picture. Sorry its so blurry, couldn't get the focus on my phone.

    My tank LED light is RGB, with a wide color range, would running the tank with a red light at night be better than the moonlight blue?

     

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  18. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    With the nocturnals I always use red light that I leave on 24/7. Most of the tanks also have a normal white/blue daylight lighting that goes off at 9:00 PM. The reasoning for the red over another low/moon light LED is the understanding that red is close to invisible to all cephalopods and you are more likely to see them under red lighting than any other color. The reason I leave it on all night is that they can still detect it but that is as dark as it gets so they don't wait for for full darkness to come out. On some tanks I only light half the tank and have found that the young ones take up residency on the lit side but usually den on the dark side as adults (but still come to the lit side)

    Blue light, on the other hand is a color that many cephs are sensative to (this may be for deep water animals and may not be for the ones we keep) and may be brighter than white light, discouraging a nocturnal.

    This was something Edie Widder mentioned in her discusion of the eJelly and the Medusa vehicle used to attract the Giant Squid in last Sunday's Discovery documentary. We have had members try using blue but only recently did one of our members experiment and report. He initial took my suggestion to set up a red light for his nocturnal macropus once the animal seemed adjusted, he tried a blue light to see if the animal acted differently. Great experiment and I encourage others to try different lighting in the same way BUT suggest you start with red.

    I have found that a fairly bright red light works well for viewing (and miserably for photography) and have used different variations. The simplest, cheapest and easiest to set up is to obtain a cone shaped (ugly) shop light with a hanging clip from your local hardware store. Also at most hardware stores and at Wal-mart, you will find red screw in fluorescent bulbs (often called party lights). The shop light's cone shape keeps the light out of your eyes and focuses on the tank but the red fluorescent bulbs have a standard screw base and can be used in any fixture supporting a 13 watt bulb.

    A more attractive alternate but dimmer and more expensive light is one of the programmable LED moon lights that offers a selection of colors. This is nice to have when you want a moon light on the tank and the next animal you have is not nocturnal. One feature I suggest looking for is a unit that will keep your setting when the power goes out. I used one for a diurnal octo but removed it from the tank because of frequent short outages that summer. The one I had defaulted to white light when first turned on and Octane would pace the tank under stress when we did not realize his light had changed. This would be my choice if it was brighter but the fluorescent gives far better viewing.

    Lastly, any light that you can make red works. On the tank I used for my mercs, I had an outdoor light and put high temperature vellum (high temp material required or you will have a fire concern even though the light was a lower heat bulb) inside the lens. Later I painted the inside of the lens red with several coats of red paint. Both worked well but I preferred the light of the vellum over the paint. White LED's with a red lens is also an alternative and I use a dome light on one side of one my split tank but wiring them up is a bit of a pain.
     
  19. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    I'll not venture a guess on age. IME, an animal in final senescence will rarely color and will not hold dark coloration at all. However, this happen pretty quickly at the end. The other thing to watch for is it being out in full daylight. This usually the signal for me to know its time is very short (a day or two only not even a week).

    Another thing that may be worth mentioning is that I have found females to choose a den and stay in it most of their lives. This makes them rather easy to hand feed but they are not very active. My males have tended to be more active, swimming about at night and changing dens every couple of weeks. Sexing them, like most other octos is easiest by looking for the curled third arm to the right (clockwise as you orient your eyes with the octos) and they often have enlarged suckers near the mouth. If it is female, she may not come out much to be able to see the arm or suckers.

    This is the one warm water species that has been more or less easier to raise than any other (the Pacific bimaculoides is actually the one with the biggest success numbers). If it is female and has mated you may get this opportunity :grin: Note that easier does not mean easy. The successes we have had allowed a small number of hatchlings to survive and mate, producing offspring that also produced limited viable hatchlings. Lifespan is 8 - 12 months and we have seen 14 months from one tank born.
     
  20. Jack_Lucas

    Jack_Lucas Blue Ring Registered

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    quick update this morning I still saw the red feeder crab hanging around in the rocks, but one of my Hermit crabs was not so lucky the octo is holding him in the den... I can only assume he is slowly devouring him as we speak...

    Is it normal for octos to feed on hermits?

    I have a full range RGB LED will start with the red light cycle tonight

    thanks!
     

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