[Image] The Largest Ammonite In the World

Phil

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Hmmmm......an 'interesting' theory, octomush. I'm going to have agree with its randomness, I'm afraid.

Juvenile ammonite hatchlings, known as 'ammonitellas' developed their initial shell, a.k.a 'protoconch' whilst still inside the egg. It is thought ammonites produced many small eggs unlike the modern Nautilus, which produces fewer larger ones.

Phil
 

Octomush

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Yes Im afraid I have masters degree in stupidity! :mrgreen: Thats cool though, the growing of the shells in the eggs and stuff. And it makes u wonder..... If those things ate those dinosaurs a long time ago. Then how come their close reletives the nautilous doesnt feed on those swimming iguanas from the gallapogos islands? Lol Yes its one stupid question after another.... lol
 

Phil

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Octomush,

Unless we have missed fossils of ammonites that grew to seventy foot high, moved onto land, and developed razor sharp beaks capable of piercing tough flesh and bone, they were not capable of 'feeding on dinosaurs'.
 

Octomush

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LOL now that would be cool..... But what I meant was those swimming dinos u know the ones with the fins and stuff? :roflmao:
 

Snafflehound

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Phil said:
Octomush,

Unless we have missed fossils of ammonites that grew to seventy foot high, moved onto land, and developed razor sharp beaks capable of piercing tough flesh and bone, they were not capable of 'feeding on dinosaurs'.
We have the Pacific Tree Octopus, why not the Triassic Fern Ammonite?
 

Phil

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Snafflehound said:
Triassic Fern Ammonite
:)

Octomush said:
LOL now that would be cool..... But what I meant was those swimming dinos u know the ones with the fins and stuff? :roflmao:
I'm afraid they were not dinosaurs, I'd imagine you are referring to plesiosaurs and ichthyosaurs. Have a look at these two great sites for more information:

Ichthyosaur Home Page

The Plesiosaur Site
 



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