Identification References

Discussion in 'Physiology and Biology' started by DWhatley, Aug 18, 2011.

  1. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,078
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
  2. mucktopus

    mucktopus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2003
    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    51
    Wow- very cool! Thanks for posting!
     
  3. Level_Head

    Level_Head Vampyroteuthis Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2010
    Messages:
    266
    Likes Received:
    20
    It's almost tougher with octopuses, isn't it?
     
  4. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,078
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    neurobadger has mentioned that her summer work suggests squid are easier but I am not sure Kat would agree once you get past the common ones. One observation I have made is that a dead octopus in formalin looks like an octopus. When I have a request for a preserved one, I sometime have difficulty with which ones I have if there are several available (fortunately this has only happened a couple of times, usually I don't have a collection). Species descriptions from dead animals don't help a lot with IDing live ones.
     
  5. neurobadger

    neurobadger Vampyroteuthis Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2010
    Messages:
    475
    Likes Received:
    22
    A dead octopus looks like An Octopus, whereas a dead Enoploteuthis obliqua looks like a dead Enoploteuthis obliqua .
     
    GPO87 likes this.
  6. Cheerioteuthis

    Cheerioteuthis Larval Mass Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
  7. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,078
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Thanks and welcome Cheerioteuthis. As entries are made, I will add them to the first post to keep them visible.
     
  8. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,078
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Archipelagos Library A brief set of descriptions for two of the of the Cuttlefish found in the Mediterranean, Sepia officianalis and Sepia eLegans
     
  9. GPO87

    GPO87 Sepia elegans Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2005
    Messages:
    789
    Likes Received:
    164
    Location:
    Dancing between Vancouver and Auckland
    I have to admit, that first one can be quite a challenge if you don't know what you are looking for. I tried to get it to project a Teuthowenia, and failed miserably:smile:!
     
  10. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,078
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    GPO87,
    I would be helpful if they would present a highlilghted list all the species available and then unhighlight the animals that are eliminated as you make choices. Soooo many things we can do that we don't ... :sad:
     
  11. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,078
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Octopus Suckers Identification Code (OSIC) - Full Text available
    Francesca Tramacereab*, Lucia Beccaia, Michael J. Kubacd & Barbara Mazzolaia


    As a programmer, I will strongly object to the design of this suggested notation as it is not one that is easily stored, typed or referenced. For both typing and data handling, the always present data should be first, followed by the maybe data. The content seems to be well thought out but something more on the order of S34B5L2L3 Where S34 indicates the 34th sucker, B5 a count of the beak area suckers, L2 the 2nd left arm and L3 indicating the adjacent arm. Alternately the row indicator could be solely a letter indicating the side rather than the adjacent arm number. Lower case could be used (S34B5L2l ) in formal presentations and it should not be confusing when hand written since the optional last character can only be blank, l or r.

    Octopus, How Do You Count Your Suckers?
    Scientific American, Octopus Chronicles 2013/12, Katherine Harmon Courage

    Katherine blogs about the above study and proposal.
     
    Tintenfisch likes this.
  12. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,078
    Likes Received:
    1,123
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    The early life history of two sympatric New Zealand octopuses: eggs and paralarvae of Octopus huttoniand Pinnoctopus cordiformis
    S A Carrasco 2013 - (subscription)

     
  13. Jean

    Jean Colossal Squid Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2002
    Messages:
    4,218
    Likes Received:
    138
    Location:
    Dunedin, New Zealand
    For NZ I still go for
    The marine fauna of New Zealand: Octopoda (Mollusca:Cephalopoda) (NIWA biodiversity memoir)
    by Steve O'Shea sadly not available online but Amazon have it :grin:

    for the world (it's old but....!)online at http://www.fao.org/docrep/009/ac479e/ac479e00.htm
    [​IMG]
    FAO Fisheries Synopsis No. 125, Volume 3

    FAO Species Catalogue Vol. 3.
    Cephalopods of The World
    An Annotated and Illustrated Catalogue of Species of Interest to Fisheries
     
    DWhatley likes this.

Share This Page