Hypothetical situation Colossal squid interaction with white shark

cuttlegirl

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Some sharks need to keep moving to force water over their gills, but there are many sharks that do not. Bottom dwelling species like horn sharks, swell sharks and even nurse sharks spend a lot of time sitting on the substrate.
 

OB

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Danno;109548 said:


BAM! Never thought I'd find it.
Yet, you did :biggrin2:

Squid will obviously eat fish/sharks, roughly their own size, sometimes even slightly larger, your Nat Geo pic being case in point.

I guess the question raised at the start of this topic should have been 450 kg Charcharodon vs. 450kg Mesonychoteuthis.

That's three meters worth of jaws and three meters worth of mantle length.

M lacks sufficient business end, regardless, so my bets are still on ole' whitey.

Yet...

Great whites seem to prefer a kill/lethal wound at first strike, one single massive bite, and then only start chomping away at the carcass once it's sufficiently dead. Not a good strategy if likely several well aimed chomps are required to take out our crimson companion...

And...

Mackerel sharks, in contrast to bottom dwellers that actively "breathe", do require constant movement, so the immobilising/suffocation trick could actually work in this case....

Hmmmm...
 

Steve O'Shea

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I simply cannot imagine Mesonychoteuthis initiating an attack against something larger, especially the likes of a large shark or cetacean, both likely to inflict upon it a terminal wound.

I'm not entirely convinced that the images (snap shots in time) of Nototodarus 'attacking' a (very!!) small shark as posted earlier are evidence that this species eats shark either. We don't know what is happening, other than the squid 'embraced' a very small shark. Did it eat it, or was it a defensive action? We so often find squid in the stomachs of shark - and large squid at that! For all we know the squid in the earlier-posted images lost several arms as a result of its encounter with this shark, and the shark swam off, happy, only to go through a similar encounter with another squid another day(perhaps this is how small shark feed on larger squid; a painful embrace for the squid).

I've not ever seen the remains of shark in the stomach of squid, but I have so often seen squid in the stomach of shark (and other fish). Admittedly, the eye lenses of small fish can be found in squid stomachs (more correctly, stomach caecum).

What we've seen with paralarval squid is that they are quite capable of taking down prey their own size to 1.5 times their own size, but prey size decreases relative to squid size as the squid grows.
 

OB

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3 year old link, still up, on cephalopod predation (aot) by sleeper sharks; great sucker marks in one of the pictures, further substantiating Somniosus as an apex predator of squid and octopus.

 

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