Hi from Indonesia

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Allonautilus, Oct 1, 2006.

  1. Allonautilus

    Allonautilus Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    Hello all,
    I've been viewing this site since a few years ago, but today is the first time I registered myself to this TONMO. I got myself hooked to marine biology (and thus cephalopods) for quite a long time and I find this website very useful for my research :)

    Currently, I am interested in ammonite paleobiology - especially the field concerning the soft body anatomy, which is quite an elusive bit of information anywhere else.
     
  2. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

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    Hey, thanks for de-lurking!! Welcome to the community! :smile:
     
  3. sorseress

    sorseress Colossal Squid Supporter

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    Welcome Allonautilus! :welcome: I'm sure you long ago discovered the fossils page.
     
  4. Allonautilus

    Allonautilus Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    Thank you so much everyone! I think I'm going to love this community:wink:
     
  5. monty

    monty Colossal Squid Staff Member Supporter

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    :welcome: :earlyammo
     
  6. mucktopus

    mucktopus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

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    Selamat datang!
     
  7. erich orser

    erich orser Architeuthis Supporter Registered

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    :welcome: to Tonmo.com! It's very cephy here, as I'm sure you already know. You'll like it!
     
  8. Allonautilus

    Allonautilus Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    hey, thanks everyone ! :grin:

    terima kasih !
     
  9. cuttlegirl

    cuttlegirl Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    :welcome: to our world!
     
  10. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    :welcome: to TONMO!
    This is quite elusive everywhere :wink:
     
  11. Allonautilus

    Allonautilus Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    Heheh, yeah it is :D
     
  12. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Oh crikey, I'm so sorry I missed your welcome message! Love the avatar you have there, most definitely a good choice.

    Do you have any opinions on ammonoid soft-body form? If so I'm sure we'd love to hear about your ideas. For me, one of the main ones is simply why we don't find them? Why is it that belemnoid soft bodied fossils be found in some contexts (e.g. Solnhofen), yet associated ammonites are just the shell? Were they that different?

    Welcome again, and my apologies again for being late to greet you!

    :bonk: :ceratite:
     
  13. dutchcourage

    dutchcourage GPO Registered

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  14. jc45

    jc45 GPO Registered

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    :welcome:! Have fun reading all about ceph fossils here on Tonmo.com! :read:

    Joey
     
  15. Allonautilus

    Allonautilus Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    Heheh, thanks everyone! I'm really glad being able to meet all of you :wink:.

    And thanks Phil! I'm happy that someone actually liked my avatar :grin: , the ammonite not quite what I've imagined though.......I made it in rush :neutral:. The guilt is now mutual as I replied to your message quite late too, just by now :mrgreen:

    Concerning ammonite soft body.......hmmmm, what in my mind presently is, I am not really sure on how they might looked like in real life, but I found your opinion that they might be similar to octopus and squids based on radula quite plausible. After all, they are steps ahead from nautiloids, and I think the chance of them possessing advanced organs just like their naked relatives very possible (that is, not possessing too much tentacles or pinhole eyes).

    I wonder if fossil nautiloids ever have their soft bodies preserved? or differences between nautilus and coleoid tissue? What in my mind is, if coleoids have a different tissue composition compared to nautilus (or nautiloids, for that case), plus if nautiloids never have their flesh fossilized, then there is a chance that ammonoids have their body (or at least tissue composition) quite similar to nautiloids.

    But then, my guesses above are nothing more than amateur conjectures, and I'm nothing more than a highschool marine biologist-wannabe. I hope someday I will be able to become the real one, just like all of you :smile:

    Best Wishes,

    -agha.]
     
  16. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Hi Allonautilus,

    That's a excellent point about fossils of Nautilus itself, afterall, I think it has barely changed in 30m years or so. I'm not aware of any but that doesn't mean anything...soft-bodied fossils of Nautilus, or the lack of, may indeed imply a close analogue to ammonoids. I am certain there are no soft-bodied nautiloid fossils unfortunately. I like your thoughts a great deal there.

    I think ammonite eyes may have been more highly developed than the Nautilus pinhole-type as occasional rare fossils have been found displaying striking visual colour patterns; though I suppose such patterns may arguably have been used to confuse predators by breaking up the outline. It's hard to imagine lappets being used for any other purpose than visual display for courtship though as these are only found on the males of some species. I expect they were highly visual animals, inded, unlike Nautilus they had many forms that lived in the shallow brightly-lit upper layers of the ocean too.

    All the best!
     
  17. Allonautilus

    Allonautilus Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    Dear Phil,

    Thank you so much for enlightening me with all of these. I am agree with you that ammonites might have advanced eyes with lenses in their
    life. I don't think pinhole eyes just like those found on nautilus can pass the optical information correctly when subjected to the bright lighting of shallow water. And yes, the lappets, I imagined them brightly colored to attract females.

    Wish someone discovered a living species of ammonite, or at least, the fossilized soft body.....haha, who knows, the ocean herself is largely unexplored, even until now :wink: . What floats in the dark blue, watery depths of the ocean cannot be seen immediately, even just a few metres away, unlike the way we see birds flying in the sky.

    And again, thank you! Your opinions are definitely great pieces of rare information that I can never find elsewhere :)

    Best Wishes,

    -agha.]
     

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