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Heavy Breathing

CHolland

Pygmy Octopus
Registered
Joined
Jan 12, 2017
Messages
14
Location
Florida
#1
First time octopus keeper (for less than a week). I have been reading other threads that have mentioned heavy breathing as a warning sign something is wrong.

At what point is the breathing considered "heavy"? I can see his siphon open and close and his mantle slightly rise and lower, but I'm not sure what the standard is for heavy or normal breathing. Are there other warning signs I should keep an eye out for along with his breathing? He does have dens (he has made several) and does eat at least one large, live shrimp a night.

Thank you for your help!
 

tonmo

Titanites
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Webmaster
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May 30, 2000
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9,120
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Pennsylvania
#2
Thanks for posting! Any chance you can share a video or pic?
 

CHolland

Pygmy Octopus
Registered
Joined
Jan 12, 2017
Messages
14
Location
Florida
#3
Sorry for the horrible quality, I can't get close enough with my phone under regular lighting without spooking him. He is still acclimating.

I should add, this is a typical example of his breathing. Its a little (but not much) more intense when he's hunting or if my two year old gets a little excited and runs up to the tank too fast. :smile:
 

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DWhatley

Cthulhu
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Sep 4, 2006
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19,791
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Gainesville, GA
#5
I can't tell anything from the short video. Trying to define "heavy breathing" is a challenge. My first attempt would be to say if you notice an octopus breathing without intentionally staring at the gills then stress is a suspect. I would prefer to give you a breaths per minute number but can't. If the breathing is noticeable for the better part of 5 minutes, I would (in addition to testing the water for ammonia and nitrite) suggest a water change and make sure that your pumps and water movement equipment are helping with the CO2 to air exchange.
 

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