Have some Mercury, please:

gjbarord

Sepia elegans
Staff member
Moderator
#2
Along those same lines...Isn't that area also known for shark fin soup?? From what I understand, the shark fin adds no flavor at all and is merely a status symbol?!?!!

Asimov said it best "The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom". True today as well.

What can you do?

Greg (Doesn't someone have this on their signature, great quote)
 

Animal Mother

Architeuthis
Supporter
#3
gjbarord;109250 said:
Along those same lines...Isn't that area also known for shark fin soup?? From what I understand, the shark fin adds no flavor at all and is merely a status symbol?!?!!

Asimov said it best "The saddest aspect of life right now is that science gathers knowledge faster than society gathers wisdom". True today as well.

What can you do?

Greg (Doesn't someone have this on their signature, great quote)
I believe that's Monty's sig.
 

cuttlegirl

Colossal Squid
Supporter
Registered
#4
It's ob's signature...

I have to say, that while I grew up on tuna fish sandwiches, my children have never eaten one... I limit their seafood intake to an occasional fish stick or shrimp. If I know it has mercury in it, why would I ever feed it to my children? I think there is no safe level of mercury for a child. If you are an adult, well, it is your body...
 

chrono_war01

Colossal Squid
Supporter
#5
Can't really say that I'm a sharks fin soup advocate, but I personally do find that it really does make things a little bit more classy, just like that microscopic dollop of caviar in your dish that is so small you probably can't taste.
Taste wise, it just takes in flavor from other foods very well and the texture is pretty much the only thing I can praise about it. By itself, it's about as tasty as chomping on a boiled bone.

And we're back to tuna:
This report actually came in after a very successful Japanese restaurant managed to bid a few of the best Tunas from Japan. Opinions were mixed and the usual confirmation by store managers saying that they do try and warn customers to limit their consumption of tuna especially those with children and pregnant women.

The general atitude here really isn't worried, since Tuna really isn't a main stable of our diet, although the local officals did suggest we eat something not so high up in the food chain and with a shorter life span instead of tuna. (Clams, shrimps, assorted list of fish..etc.)
 

gjbarord

Sepia elegans
Staff member
Moderator
#6
chrono_war01,

Last comment on this and I will let it go because this is a cephalopod list... If you do not mind me asking, so you do consume shark fin soup given the methods by which the fins are collected from the sharks?

Greg
 

cthulhu77

Titanites
Supporter
#7
Hopefully not. The sharks are usually dumped back in the ocean after having their fins severed.

I don't really care if people who eat fish consume more mercury...the faster they are off of the planet, the better, perhaps.

It just amazes me that humans continue with "traditions" that are so obviously out-of-whack with reality.

We consume NO saltwater fish, and Shanlyn eats only freshwater (I don't even eat those). Sustainable filter feeders now and again, though even that is getting rare around these parts.
Now, where is that cow? Yum, you fart machine!
 

chrono_war01

Colossal Squid
Supporter
#8
gjbarord;109259 said:
chrono_war01,

Last comment on this and I will let it go because this is a cephalopod list... If you do not mind me asking, so you do consume shark fin soup given the methods by which the fins are collected from the sharks?

Greg
Yes, becuase there is no point in a lone person arguing against the ordering or consumption of sharks fin soup when you know they're going to order it regardless of whether you have it or not. The servings are exactly the same, either you can have the soup, or you can leave the soup and they can throw it in the bin.
I'd rather not waste food.
 

cthulhu77

Titanites
Supporter
#9
That way lies madness. If no one ordered it, it would not be on the menu. This is somewhat like the go-around that Sir Righty and I have had in regards to rare octopus keeping. My wife's family have the same opinion, they often order orange roughy when we are out, because "they are going to go extinct anyway, right?" You should see some of the spectacular scenes I throw in public restaraunts.

Times...they are changing, and those who can not change with them may fail. By 2050, sharkfin soup will not be on the menu anyway, unless humans consume the life from the sea with a bit more sanity.
 

chrono_war01

Colossal Squid
Supporter
#10
A family dinner consists of 12 poeple, the opinons of me does not matter if the remaining 11 of them don't care. You have to remember, I am from the youngest generation, which means that I basically have no say when it comes to such things. If no one ordered it, then I wouldn't be complaining, but if someone above me orders it and the majority of the poeple do not find a problem with it, then I do not see the point in arguing and making yourself look like an ass.
 

cthulhu77

Titanites
Supporter
#11
Ah well, her family already thinks I am an ass, so it is no problem.

Besides, much like some other naturalists, I prefer the company of animals to people. (except for cephheads, of course!) I hear where you are coming from, Chrono...public pressure can be tough, family pressure even tougher. Can't fault you for being nice !

Think of the sharks, though. No fins, dead in a matter of minutes, confused and not knowing what the heck just happened. Kind of like being plucked out of the blue, having your arms and legs ripped off, then dropped back into the city, flopping around. Yikes.:squidaut:
 

Animal Mother

Architeuthis
Supporter
#12
cthulhu77;109268 said:
Ah well, her family already thinks I am an ass, so it is no problem.

Besides, much like some other naturalists, I prefer the company of animals to people. (except for cephheads, of course!) I hear where you are coming from, Chrono...public pressure can be tough, family pressure even tougher. Can't fault you for being nice !

Think of the sharks, though. No fins, dead in a matter of minutes, confused and not knowing what the heck just happened. Kind of like being plucked out of the blue, having your arms and legs ripped off, then dropped back into the city, flopping around. Yikes.:squidaut:
Alien abduction. :cyclops:
 

Tintenfisch

Architeuthis
Staff member
Moderator
#13
Even the youngest in a large family can make a difference - one less bowl of sharkfin soup may seem like a tiny amount, but it's one less bowl that gets sold to support a completely inhumane and unsustainable fishing method. Plus (if you think this way), the thought 'no sharks were de-finned for me today' tastes much better. :wink:
 

monty

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Supporter
#14
In Chrono's defense, in a lot of families the social consequences for refusing someone's hospitality can be a lot higher than the "drop in the bucket" benefits to the sharks. Choosing to be steadfast about making a statement with one's lifestyle can be admirable, but choosing one's battles wisely can be as well... and I have a great admiration for Chrono's "market adventures" approach, so I don't think it's fair to say he doesn't think of these things...

For what it's worth, I accidentally got shark-fin soup in a dim sum restaurant (and both felt bad and paid through the nose: I think it was around $25 for a bowl of soup) and I found that it was a lot like egg drop soup with some mild and not-appealing-to-me fishiness to it... I honestly don't see the appeal, I'd rather get hot-and-sour soup (which is what it looked like in the cart, and how I made the mistake.) :yuck:
 

cthulhu77

Titanites
Supporter
#15
Oh, don't even bring up hot and sour soup. Got blasted on JagerMeister one night, and spent the evening horizontal over the can. Next day, we were off to a restaraunt where they served that stuff...tasted the same as the jager did coming up. eeeeewwww.

I certainly don't fault ChronoWar at all, it is tough to go against the grain, and no one wants to be eliminated from the family table for fighting a tradition.

I'm lucky, giving up any sort of fish was easy for me. I don't see how anyone chokes it down. Gross.
 

gjbarord

Sepia elegans
Staff member
Moderator
#16
It is tough to go against the grain but not impossible. Does everyone remember when whales were hunted to extinction? Someone had to initially speak up and go against the grain and look what it accomplished, all be it a little to late.

There are plenty of examples like this.

Cultures may be different but that does not mean change is not possible. Why not change now when they have the choice, rather than having to change as a result of over-fishing sharks and their subsequent extinction, as well as the possible collapse of the ocean food chain? Is that really too far of an exaggeration?

Greg:twocents:
 

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