Hapalochlaena Ssp. Information

Discussion in 'Octopodidae' started by skywindsurfer, Nov 4, 2010.

  1. skywindsurfer

    skywindsurfer Architeuthis Registered

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    I'm trying to find any and all information I can on all Hapalochlaena Ssp. Any information that anyone could give would be appreciated. I'm not doing this so that I may be better educated in purchasing one later. I just resently acquired an itching facination with everything Hapalochlaena and I need to scratch it. :bonk:

    Now let me add that I am looking for genuine informtation pertaining to these animals and not just random :silenced: that Joe Smoe posted to look cool. Anything like news articles, scientific papers, even videos would be appreciated. Thanks for the help everyone.
     
  2. OB

    OB Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

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    The most important piece of information you'll need is that you don't carry a loaded gun into a house with curious infants. The animals are not suited for pet-keeping, it is as simple as that. I know people will do it, and that is their choice and responsibility. These Octopus species are shy, small, drab in coloration unless startled, and impossible to physically interact with like with any other species, for reasons of their extreme toxicity. Oh yeah, and they have an average life expectancy in captivity of around two months. No proper research has been done into how poisonous these animals are when kept outside of their natural reef habitat; the colonisation of their salivary glands is not that well understood, but as you'd be getting a live caught specimen of around 4 months old, I would strongly suggest to avoid the risk of finding out. A fair number of people "like" blue rings, for the same reason they "like" their pitbull terrier, or inland taipan.... I am not at all suggesting you fall into this category, but unless I (literally) had an ICU at the ready, I'd prefer to be bitten by the pitbull.

    So, enough fear mongering, lest I be seen as feeding the proverbial troll, which I still am convinced you're not. You will find most relevant info in literature, use google scholar for a quick scan. This will quickly bring the message home that Hapolachlaena really is the absolute worst of all options of non-pelagic cephalopods to keep.
     
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  3. skywindsurfer

    skywindsurfer Architeuthis Registered

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    I'm not trying to keep them ob. There's just to much at risk,...like my life and my families'. I've just recently took a fancy to them and would like to learn more about the species.
     
  4. Neogonodactylus

    Neogonodactylus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

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    Well I have to take exception to the statement that no proper research has been done on the toxicity of Hapalochlaena kept in captivity. We (Williams and Caldwell) have published a couple of papers on TTX levels in eggs and hatchlings from animals held in the lab and more are in the pipeline.

    Roy
     
  5. skywindsurfer

    skywindsurfer Architeuthis Registered

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  6. OB

    OB Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

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    Which is great! Thanks for the correction :wink:
     
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