Golf Course Glacial Till

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Fossils' started by Pr0teusUnbound, May 1, 2013.

  1. Pr0teusUnbound

    Pr0teusUnbound GPO Registered

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    i recently got a maintenance job at a local golf course and found some fossils in the soil, and at least one of them it a cephalopod. here are a few of them now:

    1. 2.

    3. 4.
     

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  2. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    LOL, what a great job for you! This should be interesting.
     
  3. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Nice fossils! And one does indeed seem to be a cephalopod. 8-)

    Find more.
     
  4. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    bottom right? :grin:
     
  5. Terri

    Terri Sepia elegans Registered

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    Let's see how I do...:hmm:

    1. Apertural end of a Horn Coral?
    2. Worn Tabulate Coral?
    3. Don't know, maybe burrows of some sort?
    4. Possible ceph, could we see a view of the broken end?
     
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  6. Pr0teusUnbound

    Pr0teusUnbound GPO Registered

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    all i know for sure about 1 and 2 is that they are both rugose. they resemble Heliophyllum and Eridiophyllum from the Devonian, but i cant tell what period theyre from. 3 might be a Mississippian rugose coral. im pretty sure 4 is the Mississippian nautiloid Mooreoceras. one of the papers ive read lists about 9 species in Michigan (along with over a dozen other ammonoid and nautiloid genera).
     

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