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Getting rid of nitrates

Spocktopus

O. bimaculoides
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Joined
May 31, 2006
Messages
54
#1
What is a good way to get rid of nitrates in a closed, circulating system? I have been doing daily 10 gal water changes on my system which has 2 40-50 gal tanks and a sump that consists of a large black bucket of unknown capacity. It has been sufficient for a while, but of late my octos have shown a decline in appetite. How might I reduce the nitrate level in the system?
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
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Joined
Dec 22, 2004
Messages
1,713
#7
I have a ton of chaeto right now, and unlike the places listed above, I won't make you pay $30 just for shipping :)

Dan
 

Spocktopus

O. bimaculoides
Registered
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May 31, 2006
Messages
54
#9
I do live near the ocean. How would I identify such algae? And how much does it cost if I were to buy it? And are there any special things I need to have to keep the algae alive? How much should I get?
 

oceanbound

O. bimaculoides
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Joined
Jan 3, 2006
Messages
69
#10
well i have a species of calerpa in mine and it looks like a bunch of bubbles on a single shaft. it grows pretty quick. i don't have anything special. just a powerhead to keep off detritus and such.
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
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Dec 22, 2004
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1,713
#12
I'd stay away from caulerpa, it can pollute your tank. Macros will grow fine under normal-output fluorescents, but they do grow faster with more light.

Dan
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
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Dec 22, 2004
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1,713
#14
When caulerpa decides to reproduce sexually, it releases thousands of spores into the water and most of it dies. If you wake up to a cloudy tank, this is probably the culprit.

There are also environmental concerns. I think C. racemosa is OK, but C. taxifolia is invasive and is currently conquering the Mediterranean. I believe California and Florida already have laws against owning it.

Dan
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
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Joined
Dec 22, 2004
Messages
1,713
#16
The releasing of the spores is what you want to avoid, and its difficult to predict more than a few hours in advance.

This is why I use chaeto and not caulerpa.

Dan
 

DHyslop

Architeuthis
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Dec 22, 2004
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1,713
#18
I've never had it happen to me, but I suppose once they're released you can desperately try to change the water or filter them out before they decompose, create an ammonia spike, and kill the more fragile things in the system.
 

Spocktopus

O. bimaculoides
Registered
Joined
May 31, 2006
Messages
54
#20
Is this macro algae anything I could go and harvest from the bay nearby? I am currently on the Maine coastline of the Atlantic. There are a couple of researchers and an aquarium club at our school (which I am currently at), but it's hard to get a hold of people over the summer.
 

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