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Architeuthoceras

Architeuthis
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#1
With things slow in the fossils and history forum I will start posting some pics of things in my collection.

First is a crushed shell of Stenolobulites sinuosus from the Permian Meade Peak Member of the Phosphoria Formation. Also what was referred to Cornaptychus back in 1964, is it a Jaw Operculum or Bivalve?

:smile:
 

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Architeuthoceras

Architeuthis
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#3
For those with access, here is the article (or the first page for the rest of us) by Closs, Gordon and Yochelson describing the cornaptychi. The genus Pseudogastrioceras has now been referred to Stenolobulites.

I thought I had a paper stating they were bivalves but I must have been dreaming. :oops: They do have the morphology for aptychi.
 

neuropteris

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#9
Flippin heck! Some sizeable ammonites there Kevin. Were those run of the mill finds or we they particulary good? What sort of trilobites were they?
 

Architeuthoceras

Architeuthis
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#10
Those ammonites are Prionocyclus macombi, that was a little glory hole I took my two brothers and their kids to, they can still be found but not alot congregated in a small spot like that.

We were digging for Modocia typicalis trilobites in the Marjum Formation, dig all day for 1 or 2 but there were alot of little agnostids. The trilobites found in that quarry split on their ventral side so you have to glue the two split pieces back together and prep down from the top to get to the fossil, very time consuming, but well worth it.
 

Emily182

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#12
Wow your finds look great. It amazes me how you can identify the species. Ammonites and some nautiloids all look the same to me, except for those crazy heteromorphs.

By the way... 1972??!! You have been fossil hunting for a long time haven't you?
 

baldtankman

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#14
Architeuthoceras;85538 said:
With things slow in the fossils and history forum I will start posting some pics of things in my collection.

First is a crushed shell of Stenolobulites sinuosus from the Permian Meade Peak Member of the Phosphoria Formation. Also what was referred to Cornaptychus back in 1964, is it a Jaw Operculum or Bivalve?

:smile:
The bi-valve looks remarkable like a freshwater mussel. I have seen many form the South Island of NZ
 

Architeuthoceras

Architeuthis
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#15
baldtankman;128774 said:
The bi-valve looks remarkable like a freshwater mussel. I have seen many form the South Island of NZ
According to the geologists, the Meade Peak Member is a very deep marine deposit. The ?bivalves, like all the ammonoids, are completely flattened, with little sign of breakage they were probably flat to start with. Still they look alot like the clams we used to find around here.:smile:
 

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