EU Directive 2010/63/EU

Discussion in 'Physiology and Biology' started by DWhatley, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Cephalopod research and EU Directive 2010/63/EU: Requirements, impacts and ethical review
    Jane A. Smith,Paul L.R. Andrews, Penny Hawkins, Susanna Louhimies, Giovanna Ponte, Ludovic Dickel
     
  2. gjbarord

    gjbarord Sepia elegans Staff Member Moderator

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    At the airport heading to Kansas City for a conference and just read the paper on a free iPad at Laguardia, which is awesome!!! What isn't awesome is that alcohol is not served until 8am..... To the paper, good review on what the new directive entails and some interesting discussion points as well. However, I'm still at a loss for the reasoning behind the directive.... Were there questionable practices going on????? The reference to the 3 Rs was a good talking point and makes sense. It also makes sense to report how animals were collected from the wild, including methods, mortalities, etc. But I ask, why wasn't this done before? Who wasn't doing this? I was also surprised that the all encompassing directive still does not cover ALL types of experiments and those not covered will be assessed based on a "best judgment" policy. Seems strange given the scope of the directive. The directive definitely brings up some good points but the need for increased regulations and oversight seems a bit much.... Going forward in the USA, I don't believe we need more regulations for cephalopods. Rather, we should utilize the information in the directive for discussion and to simply take another look at our methods and how we conduct experiments. I like the ideas in the directive. I don't like the increased oversight. Greg
     
  3. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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  4. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Scientists Learn How to Put an Octopus to Sleep
    By Katherine Harmon Courage | April 29, 2014 |

     
  5. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    This might be going a bit too far ...

    The Use of Artificial Crabs for Testing Predatory Behavior and Health in the Octopus1
    Piero Amodio, Paul Andrews, Marinella Salemme, Giovanna Ponte 2014 (pdf)

     
  6. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    US Animal Welfare Act

    EU Directive


    Guidelines for the Care and Welfare of Cephalopods in Research –A consensus based on an initiative by CephRes, FELASA and the Boyd Group

    Below is a list of ceph sensitivity studies compiled by Eric Edsinger ( @000generic ) in preparation for his doctoral research:

    Alupay, J. S., Hadjisolomou, S. P., & Crook, R. J. (2014). Arm injury produces long-term behavioral and neural hypersensitivity in octopus. Neuroscience Letters, 1–6.

    Andrews, P. L. R. (2011). Introduction: laboratory invertebrates: only spineless, or spineless and painless? ILAR Journal / National Research Council, Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources, 52(2), 121–125.

    Andrews, P. L. R., Darmaillacq, A.-S., Dennison, N., Gleadall, I. G., Hawkins, P., Messenger, J. B., et al. (2013). The identification and management of pain, suffering and distress in cephalopods, including anaesthesia, analgesia and humane killing. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 447(C), 46–64.

    Crook, R. J., & Walters, E. T. (2011a). Nociceptive behavior and physiology of molluscs: animal welfare implications. ILAR Journal / National Research Council, Institute of Laboratory Animal Resources, 52(2), 185–195.

    Crook, R. J., Lewis, T., Hanlon, R. T., & Walters, E. T. (2011b). Peripheral injury induces long-term sensitization of defensive responses to visual and tactile stimuli in the squid Loligo pealeii, Lesueur 1821. Journal of Experimental Biology, 214(19), 3173–3185.

    Crook, R. J., Hanlon, R. T., & Walters, E. T. (2013). Squid Have Nociceptors That Display Widespread Long-Term Sensitization and Spontaneous Activity after Bodily Injury. Journal of Neuroscience, 33(24), 10021–10026.

    Crook, R. J., Dickson, K., Hanlon, R. T., & Walters, E. T. (2014). Nociceptive Sensitization Reduces Predation Risk. Current Biology, 24(10), 1121–1125.

    Fiorito, G., Affuso, A., Anderson, D. B., Basil, J., Bonnaud, L., Botta, G., et al. (2014). Cephalopods in neuroscience: regulations, research and the 3Rs. Invertebrate Neuroscience, 14(1), 13–36.

    Fiorito, G., Affuso, A., Basil, J., Cole, A., de Girolamo, P., D'Angelo, L., et al. (2015). Guidelines for the Care and Welfare of Cephalopods in Research -A consensus based on an initiative by CephRes, FELASA and the Boyd Group. Laboratory Animals, 49(2 Suppl), 1–90.

    Hague, T., Florini, M., & Andrews, P. L. R. (2013). Preliminary in vitro functional evidence for reflex responses to noxious stimuli in the arms of Octopus vulgaris. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 447(C), 100–105.

    Mather, J. A. (2008). Cephalopod consciousness: behavioural evidence. Consciousness and Cognition, 17(1), 37–48.

    Moltschaniwskyj, N. A., Hall, K., Lipinski, M. R., Marian, J. E. A. R., Nishiguchi, M., Sakai, M., et al. (2007). Ethical and welfare considerations when using cephalopods as experimental animals. Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, 17(2-3), 455–476.

    National Research Council (US) Committee on Recognition and Alleviation of Pain in Laboratory Animals. (2009). Recognition and Alleviation of Pain in Laboratory Animals. Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US).

    National Research Council (US) Committee for the Update of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. (2011). Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals (8 ed.). Washington (DC): National Academies Press (US).

    Polese, G., Winlow, W., & Di Cosmo, A. (2014). Dose-Dependent Effects of the Clinical Anesthetic Isoflurane on Octopus vulgaris: A Contribution to Cephalopod Welfare. Journal of Aquatic Animal Health, 26(4), 285–294.

    Smith, J. A., Andrews, P. L. R., Hawkins, P., Louhimies, S., Ponte, G., & Dickel, L. (2013). Cephalopod research and EU Directive 2010/63/EU: Requirements, impacts and ethical review. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 447(C), 31–45.
     
  7. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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  8. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Why are cephalopods protected in scientific research in Europe?
    Belinda M. Tonkins (full paper on-line)
     

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