Egg culture techniques

cuttlegirl

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lene_harbott;127018 said:
Is there danger of the mother eating the eggs, or do you think they are better off where they are for the time being?
I would leave mom and her den alone. She will do a much better job of caring for the eggs than a human. Once they hatch, you can remove them to a smaller container.
 

cuttlegirl

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dwhatley;127021 said:
The one thing that concerns me about the petri dish is that these are pelagic and not benthic and I wonder if they will eat.
You are just trying to create a small environment where you can feed them. If it looks like the petri dish is too small for them to move around comfortably, you could try a larger container, just make sure it has a large surface area to volume ratio.
 

monty

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dwhatley;127021 said:
Monty, thanks for starting the subforum. I will try to go through and find some of the links where others have tried dealing with the small eggs and put the references in one post.
Awesome! Thanks!
 

butler

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Thanks for the information. I recently had an octopus which hatched hundreds of tiny babies. Majority sucked into filter before I ran out and bought a 10 gal tank, heater and airstone. I put some live rock and tank water in there and once the water temp was equal, tranferred as many remaining babies as I could with a cup. They died rather quickly in that environment as well. Soon had dead mother with no babies. Thinking of trying again but wanted to ask if this advice applies mostly to "large egg" varieties or "small egg" varieties. I read somewhere that small egg hatchlings are nearly impossible to raise... true?
 

CaptFish

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:welcome: to TONMO

I read somewhere that small egg hatchlings are nearly impossible to raise... true?
True. It has been done by a few biologists in a Lab but never at home. Even with the Large egg species it is VERY difficult and survival rate is low. D can chime in a tell you more as she just did it successfully with. O.briareus a large egg Caribbean species.
 

DWhatley

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Chime (now we need a bell smiley). We JUST happen to have :biggrin2: a forum for discussing adventures with hatchlings and my latest is included in the list of posts. As CaptFish mentions successes with small egg species has never been accomplished with members and there are only a very few references to successes in labs or aquariums (and even then success does not include full life expectancy for the ones I have found). Large egg species are viable to try but we only have journals on a few attempts, Mama Cass and Tantanka being the latest surviving O. briareus journaled but we also have O. bimaculoides and O.mercatoris that are preforum journals. Roy et al have raised numerous large egg species in the lab at Berkeley and Steve has a number of successes with squid a AUT but we don't have journals on the student efforts.
 

ceph

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I've had some success raising the following large egged octopuses from eggs:

Bathypolypus arcticus (a deep-sea octopus)
Octopus briareus Caribbean reef octopus
Octopus mercatoris (listed as O. joubini in older lit.)
Octopus bimaculoides (Two spot)

And no luck, so far, with the small egged species. As far as I know, of the small egged species, only GPOs and O. vulgaris have been raised.

Here in Hawaii, we are very far from continental influences – all of the near shore octopuses are small egged species. Species with planktonic offspring are much more likely to make it to remote island chains than offspring of large egged species.

For large egged octopuses, amphipods and or mysid shrimp work well as first foods.
 

DWhatley

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Two part video - Vulgaris Culturing in Spain

Cultivation of Adults:


Hatching:
 

mcblsb

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I have an O. rubescens who very conveniently laid her eggs against the glass of our aquarium. She has been guarding them for over two months now and I thought they must be infertile. But each egg now sports a pair of eyes. Mother octo has furnished the area below her eggs with a pile of empty shells. I assume the babies will fall into this "habitat" when they hatch. I do not plan to mess with her care in any way. But I am wondering if there is a form of food critter I can introduce to the tank so the babies have prey. The tank already has populations of copepods, amphipods and other tine hard to seepods.
mcblsb
 

DWhatley

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Sadly, this is a small egg species so the hatchlings will not be benthic for about a month. We have had no success with small egg species in the hobby and extremely limited success with only three species that I know of with ocean flow through systems (vulgaris in Europe with 4 out of some 20,000 hatchlings that survived to benthic, but not adult, two joubini in Texas, again no adult survivors and an Alaskan animal that I don't recall the species but it was not O. rubescens). We always try when presented with the opportunity and I believe the longest lived have been 21 days. However, more typical is less than a week.

The Alaskan success used new hatched crab zoe and thought this may be key. The lack of success for the hobbyist is generally accepted as try any and everything you might think of. Here is a post by @Taollan that may shed a bit of light on the difficulties (his master's thesis was centered on O. rubescens and he is now heading up a lab that will eventually tackle raising them again)
 

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