Diving/snorkeling experiences with squid

jetlee217

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This past February, I was in St. Thomas trying to forget everything I know about computer programming. :bonk: I wanted to do lots of diving, but due to a mixup, the charter wound up being sold out :? so I wound up taking a jetski snorkel tour. Just myself and the guide went around the island to a fairly secluded spot where I jumped into the water and snorkeled around for a while. I didn't see anything of note until.... "that's not a long nose...those are tentacles!!!" :squid: There were 2, hovering about 1.5 feet from the bottom side by side. Can't relate that they did much other than undulate their fins. I was nervous about getting close...I didn't want to scare them away or get nipped. After 15 minutes of my hovering there like a log, it was time to go. Don't even know if they noticed me. :cry:

Has anyone else dove/snorkeled with squid?
 

Tentacular!

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Has anyone else dove/snorkeled with squid?
I met a gang of cuttlefish (I'm sure someone can come up with a better collective noun than that) when doing my Open Water diving certificate. This was at Nelson's Bay, a couple of hours north of Sydney. The colour changes were completely immediate and mesmerising. That experience is what got me interested in cephs, actually.
 

Colin

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how about a 'cuddle of cuttlefish'?

people often talk about them being cuddlefish (never sure whether they mean it or not????????) :mrgreen:
 

maractwin

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I've never encountered squid while scuba diving, but did see a group of three of them while snorkling. We were in Turks & Caicos, at Corals Gardens in Grace Bay. It was the first time I had seen any cephs in the wild, and was fascinated and watched them for several minutes. These were probably Caribbean reef squid (Sepioteuthis sepioidea), one large and two smaller ones that moved slowly across the reef, about mid-way between the reef and the surface (in about 20 feet of water). They basically ignored us, though we didn't try to get too close.

-Mark
 

voltron

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on the first day of my open water license dive in the red sea i ecountered first a baby/pygmy octo and minutes later a bigger one (ca. 60cm mantle).
The baby octo was quite startled by the encounter and brought up two of his front arms, quite like a boxer :lol: . He looked very mean which was too funny because he was just the size of a thumb lol

After a couple of minutes he left us, swimming backwards into a hole.
Then after a few more meters of diving we saw the bigger one, maybe a relative of the small guy. It was all around midday so he was probably sleeping. The guy sat on a stone and didn´t move, actually he was very hard to spot even from a small distance.

Sadly we had to go on with our diving exercise, i could have stayed there and watched til my air had run out..

It was a great experience and it must´ve been fate that i saw on my first underwater trip two of my favorite creatures :D


cheers
volt
 

Sedusa

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Last week I snorkelled in Malaysia and saw about 30 Sepioteuthis lessoniana... patterning and everything! quite a few little age specific groups. That made my day!
 

diveseen.com

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We regularly see octopuses (E. dofleini and O. rubescens) on our dives in Seattle. The GPO is, of course, the superstar of the two. They are simply magnificent creatures!!!!

We also will see common opalescent or market squid (Loligo opalescens) frequently on night dives, and it's not uncommon to see them mating. They are remarkable animals, but in my experience lack the personality and flair of the GPO.

We also have the Stubby Squid in the Puget Sound, which are positively adorable little creatures, and are fairly commonly seen on night dives.

There have been reports of larger squid species being washed up dead on several beaches, but it's unclear if these are occupants of the Puget Sound or if perhaps they have been brought in from the ocean on tidal currents. I have certainly never seen a large squid while diving, although it sounds like fun :mrgreen:

The market squid are not very big - usually 6-10 inches long.
 

Nancy

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Thanks for telling us about Seattle and Puget Sound. You have some
wonderful places for diving!

How large are the GPOs you see? Smaller, or full size?
Do you dive all year round, or only in the warmer season?

Nancy
 

Architeuthiscrazy

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Howdy,

I have just moved away from Bothell, a city about 20 miles north of Seattle. While living up there I enjoyed the diving very much. I have seen several rubescens including one on shore, a fisherman caught him, and three or four dofleinis. The largest I saw in the open had an arm span of approx 1m. However there is a den with one who is quite larger (Alki cove two for those wanting to check it out in the Seattle area) which I haven't seen out. The Puget Sound has some great diving. Along with the 4 species of ceph's (there could be a possibility to see five
There have been reports of larger squid species being washed up dead on several beaches, but it's unclear if these are occupants of the Puget Sound or if perhaps they have been brought in from the ocean on tidal currents.
when I lived up there all the large squids that I can remember washing ashore were Moroteuthis robusta) I have seen huge Cyanea capillata (Lions Mane Jellyfish) and at night Hexanchus griseus (Blunt Nose Six Gill Shark).

My most memorable ceph moment however came while on a night dive in Cozumel. I was diving beside a reef cluster when I spotted a lone Sepioteuthis sepioidea. He allowed me to get right up next to him and even let me pet him. I swam away a little and he followed me, he then swam away a little and I followed him. It was sort of like playing tag only he knew I couldn't keep up with him at a full jet so he treated me like I would my little sister when playing tag. I was having such a blast until another diver grabbed him and he jetted away. Oh well I had my fun for at least ten minutes. I can't wait to go back.

Michael :meso:
 

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