disease question

Discussion in 'Octopus Care' started by joefish84, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. joefish84

    joefish84 Sepia elegans Registered

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    ok so its been a while...

    last i think yall heard of me my briareus babies were all dying and i was in the process of moving. well the move went fine except all the babies died. so i figured well ive been doing the octo thing for a while how bout i go to fish for a bit. so i got a snowflake eel, big eye squirrell fish, juvenile lionfish, niger trigger, seargent major damsels, scopas tang, and put in a harlequin tusk that ive had forever. then i catch a look down at the beach thats only about 2 inches long and think hey this would be cool in the tank. then within 10 days and everything is dead except the snowflake eel. so i think well crap that sucks. then the other day i catch a baby sheeps head and a baby gag grouper(which is a freak occurance in the estuaries of south carolina) and figure well i guess i can go to a local fish tank. 3 days later both fish are dead, and the eel is still kickin.

    so finally i get over being hard headed and come to find out that what my fish may be getting is velvet, which really sucks.

    long story short im giving up on fish. im gonna put my eel in my reef tank, and go back to cephs since velvet doesnt affect inverts to my knowledge (my sea hare is fine so are my corals). so heres my question, does velvet affect octos?
     
  2. Jean

    Jean Colossal Squid Supporter

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    velvet is caused by a dinoflagellate Oƶdinium, Amyloodinium or Crepidoodinium that lives in the fishes slime coating. I can't find any ref that states it infests inverts. However to be safe you might want to treat the tank. Some suggest keeping the tank in total darkness for a bit (given that this is phytoplankton and needs to photosynthesize) or you can treat with acriflavine as for ich, but the treatment needs to be for longer. You can also decrease the s. g. of the water (fish can tolerate this for a bit, but I doubt the inverts can). The treatment of choice is actually copper sulfate..............but certainly not with inverts and especially cephs!


    You can also run the tank fish free for about a month. This will allow the organism to run through its life cycle and die out due to the lack of a host.

    J
     
  3. joefish84

    joefish84 Sepia elegans Registered

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    i think ill just go with the last option and just start searching for a ceph for the tank since it should be safe for it. thanks for the quick reply jean
     
  4. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Good to see you back Joe, I was thinking about your absence a couple of days ago but decided it would not accomplish anything to try and PM you. Did you finish the lamp aquarium? Did you move your reef or is it still in the party barn?
     
  5. joefish84

    joefish84 Sepia elegans Registered

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    the big tank is in my house im renting along with the round tank. ill have to post some pics of both. the round tank turned out amazing and slowly but surely im getting it stocked with corals
     
  6. shipposhack

    shipposhack Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

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    Usually vertebrate diseases do not affect invertebrates. Cephalopods are not a proper host for ich or velvet. This is the reason why you should quarantine fish especially when they are wild caught. When they get to a retail store they have already been through at least 2 sets of coppered tanks and diseases still get through.
     
  7. Jean

    Jean Colossal Squid Supporter

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    True but parasites are rarely that fussy, many have an invert and a vert host, eg Anisakis primary hosts are cetaceans (and sometimes humans) secondary hosts fish and squid.

    I'd place oodinium in the parasite category!

    J
     

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