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Cuttles eating Clownfish

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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#2
Re: Possible alternative foods for cuttlefish hatchlings!

@Thales
How old were the cuttles when they could successfully eat the fish? What about something much simpler to raise for food like sailfin mollies? MORE info on the possibilities please as this would likely apply to octo hatchlings as well IF the cephs get enough nutrition from the fish hatchlings.

Excerpt From the above Advanced Aquarist article:
One of the biggest hurdles in breeding cuttlefish and other cephalopods is the need for different sizes of live foods as the cuttles grow. Hatchling cuttles need tiny prey, juvenile cuttles need bigger prey, and adults need still bigger prey. Living by the ocean, I have been lucky to be able to collect my own different sized cuttlefish food, including amphipods and crabs, as I need it, as well as being able to purchase live marine shrimp from local bait shops. The access to such foods is one of the things that has helped me be successful in cuttlefish and cephalopod breeding. For people who don't live near the ocean interested in breeding cuttles and cephs, my advice has been to spend the money to have the live food shipped in because breeding food for cuttlefish, mostly shrimp and crabs, turns out to be time and space consuming, and expensive. However, with the advances in marine fish breeding a new source of marine feeder fish may be opening up.
 
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Martin Wolterding

Larval Mass
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Blue Mountains Australia
#3

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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Sep 4, 2006
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Gainesville, GA
#5
... and sometimes you can't get critters to breed. I bought a batch of red Hawaiian shrimp over a year ago in hopes of having hatchling supplemental food well in advance of any hatchlings. I still have the original 18 shrimp in one tank and the two I paired separately in another. They seem to be eating and using the full tank and rocks but don't produce offspring. I have never seen any of the shrimp even carry eggs so I don't think I have simply lost the young. I do have some cool pink volunteer sponge in the tank though :roll:
 

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