Cuttlefish Tank Questions - How much sunlight can be on my tank?

ieatfalalfel

Wonderpus
Registered
#1
I am going to set up a 40-60 gallon (not sure yet) to keep 2 to 3 (depends on the tank size) sepia bandensis along with several hermits (I have heard they make a good clean-up crew. The size depends on where I put the aquarium, and the only place I can put any size gets alot of indirect sunlight. I know that this makes algae grow in my freshwater tank, would it do the same for the bandensis tank? If so, can hermit crabs eat alot of algae? :confused:
 

CaptFish

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
#2
I have a tank that is near a window and it is a constant battle with algae I have to clean the glass everyday. I don not recomend putting a tank near a window. Also the sun can heat it up and cause too much temperature fluctuation.
 

ieatfalalfel

Wonderpus
Registered
#3
Is it getting direct sunlight or is it just in a room with a window that lets in the sun? I could put the tank against the back wall of the room about 30 or so yards from the window, but when the sun rises it would hit the tank.
 

Nancy

Titanites
Staff member
Moderator
#4
I have the same problem as CaptFish - just a bit of sunlights hits the tank in the early morning, but that is enough to encourage algae growth in that area. However, a couple of rays of sunshine in the tank are very pretty, and they're not enough to heat up the tank.

Nancy
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#6
If the tank can be positioned so that a side and not the front received the sun light, you can cover (black out) that side. I do this with a plastic removable film designed for car windows (so it is not fully opaque) and it helps a lot with the algae.
 

ieatfalalfel

Wonderpus
Registered
#7
Do I just put the plastic on the outside of the tank? And also is acrylic OK or should i get glass? I was looking at a 40 gallon sea clear tall. Would this be ok for 2 bandensis?
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#8
The plastic film I use will stay attached without glue and is removable. On some tanks I remove it every year or so to clean off the salt creap that manages to get between the film and the tank, it cleans easily in the sink and a final hot water soak makes it relatively easy to put back on the tank cleanly. There will be air pockets that will always show but I don't notice them. This is the comany I use. You may want to call them to be able to order by the yard as that offering is no longer on the website but I suspect can still be purchased if their 32" x 35" standard size won't work.

New acrylic or Glass tanks are human choices and have no impact on the animals. As with any "choices" there are pros and cons to either. Acrylic weighs much less when you are looking at larger tanks but the weight is not as important for smaller ones (20 - 50 gallons). Acrylic is easier to drill, virtually never leaks (unless improperly sealed but this usually shows up immediately) even over many, many years where the silicone (especially on a tank that gets a lot of cleaning around the silicone) on a glass tank often has to be replaced after about 10 years. Acrylic can take more of an impact and is less likely to crack if hit. Both will scratch but acrylic does not take much (especially the newer acrylics that are not supposed to yellow. IMO, this is a sales pitch for acrylic that scratches far more easily :roll:) and will be scratched from the inside just from moving your rock around and routine cleaning even with the requsite acrylic scrapers (the outside is far less of a problem but tends to be harder to look clean). Scrached glass cannot be repaired, scratched acrylic can be but the required kits are costly (around $65) and the amount of work is extensive to bring the acrylic back to a "like new" condition (requires tank draining if on the inside). Glass is far superior for photography. I have both. For sumps, I prefer acrylic hands down and have converted my older tanks for this use when I have upsized but am mixed about my feelings for smaller display tanks. Most of mine are acrylic but the glass ones are easier to clean (except around the silicone, a seamless tank - not really seamless but is molded on three sides so there is no silicone toward the front - is my definite preference). Acrylic is far more expensive than glass.

I keep octos and not cuttles (for now anyway) so I have no direct sizing experience. From prior comments, I belive a 40 tall will be pushing the limits of aggression if you have more than one in that sized tank but hopefully our keepers will give direct advice.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#11
Do you know if the hermits would be able to eat all the algae?
Not a chance

And if I found acrylic for a cheaper price than glass ( that's at my lfs ), is that a bad sign?
Are both aquariums at your LFS or are you saying you found an acrylic on-line that is cheaper than a glass at your LFS? Store owners have a lot of overhead so often they have to charge a lot for tanks. Be sure to check the cost of shipping (which is way cheaper for an acrylic and is another add on to the cost for your LFS) and get the dimension of the tank to validate gallonage (we ended up with one 10 gallons less than what we ordered once).
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#15
Whatever you choose, DON'T go taller than the length measured from under your arm to your wrist (or max to your knuckles). I have two tanks where I can't reach the bottom and maintenance is a major issue. One I can forgive because it looks cool the other I so wish it was a foot shorter.
 

CaptFish

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
#17
I was told that 46 tall is too small for two Bandensis and that 55 is needed. i too wanted to start a Bandensis tank but My spare is a 46 tall also from petsmart.
 

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