• TONMOCON VII Announced | MBL at Woods Hole | Apr 6-8, 2018
  • Thanks for visiting! TONMO is the world's greatest online cephalopod enthusiast community, with interactive content going back to May of 2000, and a biennial conference. If you'd like to join in on the fun, become a TONMO member -- it's easy and free. You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter for more cephy goodness.


Cuttle Stocking Density

magnetar68

O. vulgaris
Registered
Joined
Feb 25, 2012
Messages
84
#1
I was at the California Academy of Sciences this weekend and noticed what appeared to be 10+ cuttles in a relatively smaller tank (guessing around 75G?). There were also several juveniles in a plastic container on the side. This seems to be more than what Richard originally suggested in his 2009 article:

A single Sepia bandensis can live well in a 30 gallon aquarium, and many of the 'all in one' aquariums on the market right can work very well as a cuttlefish tank. For two Sepia bandensis I don't recommend anything smaller than 40 gallons, 3 Sepia bandensis have done well in a 55, and I have kept groups of 8 in 125 gallons. Groups of Sepia bandensis can be kept together as long as they are kept fed and they have enough space. Without enough space or food, the cuttlefish will fight and possibly damage or eat each other.
Perhaps the stocking density guidelines has risen as long as there are enough nooks and crannies for these guys to hang out in? (There is a chance I just totally blew my guess on the size of the tank as CAS).

BTW, I also did not see the flamboyants. It looks like they had been moved since there was a black ribbon eel where they used be and the tank marked for the flamboyants near the other cuttles did not appear to have any in it.
 

Thales

Colossal Squid
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jan 22, 2004
Messages
2,998
#2
magnetar68;187883 said:
I was at the California Academy of Sciences this weekend and noticed what appeared to be 10+ cuttles in a relatively smaller tank (guessing around 75G?). There were also several juveniles in a plastic container on the side. This seems to be more than what Richard originally suggested in his 2009 article:



Perhaps the stocking density guidelines has risen as long as there are enough nooks and crannies for these guys to hang out in? (There is a chance I just totally blew my guess on the size of the tank as CAS).

BTW, I also did not see the flamboyants. It looks like they had been moved since there was a black ribbon eel where they used be and the tank marked for the flamboyants near the other cuttles did not appear to have any in it.
The stocking guidelines in the articles are more for static populations in a single tank. At CAS we are constantly rotating cuttles as they age, so the guidelines don't necessarily apply. In other words, when they get large or we start to see too much agression, we move some animals to another system.

At the moment, we don't have any Flams on display and are waiting for babies to grow up a bit.

Tanks and sorry for the confusion,

Rich
 

Members online

No members online now.