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Cranchia

GPO87

Sepia elegans
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Dancing between Vancouver and Auckland
#1
This squid is awesome! Its mantle is covered in little tuberacles, giving it a fuzzy appearence.


Cranchia scabra
(There were lots of good pictures of this guy, it was hard to make up my mind. I encourage everyone to google it!)

Info at:
http://tolweb.org/cranchia
 

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Tintenfisch

Architeuthis
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Nov 19, 2002
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2,083
#4
D, it's the digestive gland, which is oriented vertically in the mantle of most cranchiids. So far it is not reported to have photophores in the viscera so it looks like it's just highly iridescent/reflective.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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#5
Cranchia scabra
Christian Klug's Facebook repost of photos and commentary by Dante Fenolio '

When threatened, the mesopelagic Cockatoo Squid (Cranchia scabra) - a "Glass Squid," can pull its head and tentacles into its mantle and turn into a ball. When aggravated, the squid waives its arms back and forth at whatever it perceives as a danger in an amazing threat display. Sometimes the squid arranges its tentacles into a crest like a cockatoo's —thus its common name, “Cockatoo Squid.” This squid has small, knoblike, cartilaginous tubercles all over its body. It also has 14 oval photophores (light producing organs) around each eye that produce a greenish light. These might be used in communication between squid at the relatively low light depths where they live or the light might be used to aid in finding food. These specimens were photographed in the Sea of Japan as well as the Gulf of Mexico. The diversity of life in the ocean's depths is outstanding. We need to do more to protect it from things like oil spills, commercial deep water fishing, and dumping of waste into our oceans. Many of these images are featured in my book, Life in the Dark. If you haven't checked out and liked the book's FB page, please go give it a look and a like.
 

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