Colossal Squid Necropsy

Steve O'Shea

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Clem said:
If the "stealth lining" theory is correct, perhaps it was most useful back when there were 12-meter, apex-predator sharks to worry about. Clem
Now this is a very interesting proposition!! Viewing things in time and space .... I forgot that extra dimension! Anyone familiar with 'prehistoric sharks' in the Antarctica of yester-millenia?
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O
 

myopsida

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With the exception of the mako shark, which does occur in tropical waters, all extant lamnid sharks (white shark & relatives), are primarily colder-water animals. Paleoecological studies suggest megalodon did not extend its range into cool temperate or polar waters. Unless the colossal squid ventures into warmer waters it's not the predator/prey relationship you're looking for :periscop: ….
 

Steve O'Shea

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.... Myopsida, I just gotta admit, that's pretty darn interesting information!

What are the chances that there are sedimentary deposits somewhere in modern-day Antarctica .... or perhaps a frozen Colossalodon ( :shock: ) frozen in the bergs?

Why has nobody pitched a doco like this? "Raising the Colossalodon" (beats mammoth any day)
 

Steve O'Shea

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Just passed this thread by Discovery Channel.

The response ...

Antarctic dig sounds interesting - except there is a couple of miles of ice
before soil isn't there? :lol:
.....
Never thought of that :oops:
 

myopsida

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there are many areas of Antarctica that are ice free and fossil rich...
Chatterjee et. al. (1984) reported on marine reptiles (plesiosaurs) from Seymour Island. Four millon year old whale fossils are being excavated near Davis Station by MacQuarie University; drilling through the ice in West Antarctica has revealed fossil diatoms from 65,000-400,000 bp; I picked up some shells on Ross Island myself. . . . do I feel a funding application coming on?
 

Steve O'Shea

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Fascinating stuff Clem.

May I ask everyone to let this thread develop as it has, and to not digress (as some threads can), as it is being monitored closely by documentary folk.

Fossil sharks, whales, toothed beasts, large squid, hooked squid, Antarctica, warm/cold water masses, life cycles of these beasts (Recent or fossil) and the likes .... and of course any relevant digression .....

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fluffysquid

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Steve O'Shea said:
There must be another reason for the dark-pigmented inner-mantle wall of the colossal squid (it is this or there is something even more formidable down there ..... shudder!). Prey (as in Patagonian Toothfish), don't bioluminesce (as far as I know), so the dark inner-mantle wall probably doesn't serve to conceal the squid from potential prey .....

Something weird is going on. Anyone with any suggestions?

Formidable pointy-toothed predators lurking in the darkness are an exciting thought. :wink: But could there also be the possibility of something rather smaller, but which finds strength in number? Just a thought from a humble undergrad.
 

Steve O'Shea

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fluffysquid said:
But could there also be the possibility of something rather smaller, but which finds strength in number? Just a thought from a humble undergrad.
Don't let the undergrad part concern you at all, FS; that's an excellent suggestion - one that I had not even considered!

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O
 

myopsida

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There must be another reason for the dark-pigmented inner-mantle wall of the colossal squid
Maybe its an adaptation to the 24-daylight during the austral summer - the dang things just like to pull thier heads in and sleep occasionally . . . .

There are sleeper sharks Somniosus sp. in Antarctic waters which reach lengths of 7 m (i.e. 6 m + imagination), but they are sluggish & unlikely to be a threat to a big squid (unless it was asleep as above)

Oh well . . its friday[/i]
 

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