Chiller for bimaculoides?

abdopus147

Blue Ring
Registered
Joined
Feb 26, 2012
Messages
42
Reaction score
2
Hi, I am new to keeping an octopus and recently acquired an octopus bimaculiodes found in a local lagoon. I am currently keeping it in a 55 gallon mature (3 months old) tank and I live Southern California. My question is should I use a chiller? If so, what is a good brand for my needs and where can I get one? Thank you!
 

DWhatley

Kraken
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Sep 4, 2006
Messages
20,536
Reaction score
1,755
Location
Gainesville, GA
The tank needs never to exceed 72F and keeping it below that will extend its life (or allow a more natural lifespan). Achieving this temp range usually requires a chiller. Diego's tank chiller is set to 68F and the tank is usually about 70F (I have an open sump so there is cooling loss). As a regular bimac keeper Joe-Ceph has written numerous care recommendations and you might look at some of his posts (link to profile on his name) or PM him directly if he does not reply soon. Diego has had life threatening problems with his eyes (or something related to his eyes) and no longer has a sense of up and down but he continues to eat and be active after lights out. I don't believe this has to do with the higher than desireable but within range temperate of his tank but the warmer water may have allowed whatever caused the problem to be more of a problem than in 65 F water. I will attemp another Bimac after he dies with the same tank and hope I don't see the same symptoms but wanted to add the cautionary note.
 

Nancy

Titanites
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2002
Messages
5,732
Reaction score
135
Location
Dallas Texas
Back in the earlier days of Tonmo, we were able to buy bimacs from a breeder who was only in business a few years. We had a number of people keeping bimacs, and were just beginning our research on the best conditions for keeping this species. So many bimacs were kept in tanks with water in the low seventies, without a chiller. The ideal temperature seems to be 68-69 degrees, as D said. However, in the wild, they may experience much higher temperatures for short periods, for instance when they are caught in a small tidepool during the day.

Nancy
 

Neogonodactylus

Haliphron Atlanticus
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Mar 17, 2003
Messages
662
Reaction score
192
But Nancy, they may experience occasional higher temperatures in tidepools and shallow coves, but that is only a small proportion of the population. Subtidal individuals will rarely experience any temperatures above 70-72. Furthermore, during the winter and early spring, bimacs will be in the 60-64 range. I keep my bimacs at a constant 60 F and several have lived for 2 to 2.5 years.

Roy
 

Nancy

Titanites
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 20, 2002
Messages
5,732
Reaction score
135
Location
Dallas Texas
Good point, Roy. maybe I wasn't very clear with what I was trying to say. Yes, we should keep our bimacs at lower temperatures. But if one day the tank is 74 or 75 degrees ( power outage, for instance), your bimac won't die.

Congratulations on reaching two years with your bimacs. The bimac at Dana Point, which was kept in the same conditions found in the area off Dana Point where it was captured, was our previous record holder. I'd have to look it up - I think a couple of their bimacs had exceeded 2 1/2years.

Nancy
 

Joe-Ceph

Haliphron Atlanticus
Supporter
Joined
Sep 25, 2006
Messages
561
Reaction score
22
I'm with Roy. I recommend a chiller, and a temp of about 62. The natural surface temp where I catch bimacs is between 57 (Feb) and 68 (Aug). I feed only every three or four days, and my last bimac lived to be over two years old.

Other reasons for a chiller are that it enables you to keep other animals, that you can catch yourself, that aren't as tolerant of warm water as a bimac (like strawberry anemone (corynactis) and Gorgonians), and it slows down all the metabolic processes in your tank, so you can feed less often, and do water changes less often. You also get very little evaporation, and so rarely need to top off the tank.

I'm a huge fan of JBJ Arctica chillers. I've run a 1/4 hp JBJ Arctica chiller almost continuously for four years. I found it used on Craigslist for between $300 and $400 (I forget).

You can keep electricity costs down by using lights and pumps (external) that add little or no heat, and by insulating the bottom, back (at least) of your tank. Also, an acrylic tank will reduce or eliminate sweating (condensation) a bit better than a glass tank. I'm extra frugal, so I insulated three sides of my tank (recommended), and double-paned the other three (only recommended if you like a DIY challenge)

 

Attachments

Joe-Ceph

Haliphron Atlanticus
Supporter
Joined
Sep 25, 2006
Messages
561
Reaction score
22
I could add that another reason I like JBJ Arctica chillers is that they are very quiet.
 

Forum statistics

Threads
19,704
Messages
203,582
Members
8,769
Latest member
Elleyyyy

Monty Awards

TONMOCON IV (2011): Terri
TONMOCON V (2013): Jean
TONMOCON VI (2015): Taollan
TONMOCON VII (2018): ekocak

About the Monty Awards
Top