Cephalopod DNA / Molecular/Genetic Studies

Discussion in 'Physiology and Biology' started by DWhatley, Feb 21, 2014.

  1. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    This is a review of the current status of ceph molecular data collection. @gjbarord is currently doing DNA work with the nautilus and hopefully will post where the information can be accessed once it is stored.

    The contribution of molecular data to our understanding of cephalopod evolution and systematics: a review A. Louise Allcock,A. Lindgren, J. M. Strugnell 2013 (subscription)

     
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  2. gjbarord

    gjbarord Sepia elegans Staff Member Moderator

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    Interesting paper. Not sure how I missed it so thanks D!!

    From a nautilus standpoint, there should be some cool stuff coming out soon...

    Greg
     
  3. gjbarord

    gjbarord Sepia elegans Staff Member Moderator

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    Awesome!!

    Greg
     
  4. GPO87

    GPO87 Sepia elegans Staff Member Moderator

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    Cranchiids of the South Atlantic Mid-Oceanic Ridge: results from the first southern MAR-ECO expedition.
    Bolstad, K. S. R., Perez, J. A. A., Strugnell, J. M., & Vidal, É. A.

     
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  5. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    The complete mitochondrial genome of Octopus conispadiceus (Sasaki, 1917) (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae)
    Yuanyuan Ma, Xiaodong Zheng, Rubin Cheng, and Qi Li 2014

     
  6. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Genetic divergence and phylogenetic analysis based on cytochrome c oxidase subunit-1 sequence of enope squid Abraliaandamanica (Goodrich 1896) inhabiting Andaman Sea
    Naveen Sathyan, Chaithanya, Anil Kumar, Sruthy, Rosamma Philip 2014 (pdf)

     
  7. Tintenfisch

    Tintenfisch Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Bolstad, K. S., Braid, H. E., & McBride, P. D. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of the squid family Mastigoteuthidae (Mollusca, Cephalopoda) based on three mitochondrial genes [2014].

    Abstract:

    Mastigoteuthid squids are ecologically important, being prey to many apex predators, yet the diversity and systematics of the family remain poorly understood. Delicate by nature, they are often damaged during capture; there is a need to accurately identify incomplete mastigoteuthid specimens from collections and stomach contents. This study aimed to test a morphological hypothesis for the division of the genera Mastigoteuthis� (Mt.), Idioteuthis, Mastigopsis (Mp.), Echinoteuthis, and Magnoteuthis (Mg.) and to assess the utility of DNA barcodes to discriminate species. Three mitochondrial genes (16S rRNA, 12S rRNA, and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I) were analysed for eight different species, representing the largest phylogenetic assessment of the family to date. Evidence was found for a potentially new species in New Zealand that has been previously misidentified as the morphologically similar species Mg. magna. Each species analysed herein exhibited unique mitochondrial DNA haplotypes for all loci, and the morphological distinction between the five proposed genera was strongly supported using a combined Bayesian and maximum-likelihood phylogenies. Of the three loci examined, the DNA barcode region shows the greatest divergence between species and should be used in future systematic work on the Mastigoteuthidae.
     
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  8. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Genetic diversity and population structure of Sepia officinalis from the Tunisian cost revealed by mitochondrial COI sequences
    Tir Meriam, Tombari Wafa, Telahigue Khawla, Hajji Tarek, Ghram Abdeljelil, Elcafsi Mhamed 2014 (subscription)

     
  9. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Characterization of Homeobox Genes Reveals Sophisticated Regionalization of the Central Nervous System in the European Cuttlefish Sepia officinalis
    Laura Focareta, Salvatore Sesso, Alison G. Cole

     
  10. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Cephalopod development: what we can learn from differences
    L Bonnaud-Ponticelli, Y Bassaglia1 2014 (PDF)


     
  11. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Make like a squid and transform

    Tel Aviv University researcher discovers that squid recode their genetic make-up on-the-fly to adjust to their surroundings
    American Friends of Tel Aviv University 2015 news article

     
  12. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    The octopus genome and the evolution of cephalopod neural and morphological novelties
    Caroline B. Albertin,Oleg Simakov,Therese Mitros,Z. Yan Wang,Judit R. Pungor,Eric Edsinger-Gonzales,Sydney Brenner,Clifton W. Ragsdale, Daniel S. Rokhsar 2015 (open access)

    Bimaculoides genome sequenced! (DWhatley)

     
  13. mucktopus

    mucktopus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

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    Here's an old one but I'll add it to the list:

    Huffard, C. L., Saarman, N., Hamilton, H., & Simison, W. B. (2010). The evolution of conspicuous facultative mimicry in octopuses: an example of secondary adaptation?. Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 101(1), 68-77.

    The ‘Mimic Octopus’Thaumoctopus mimicus Norman & Hochberg, 2005 exhibits a conspicuous primary defence mechanism (high-contrast colour pattern during ‘flatfish swimming’) that may involve facultative imperfect mimicry of conspicuous and/or inconspicuous models, both toxic and non-toxic (Soleidae and Bothidae). Here, we examine relationships between behavioural and morphological elements of conspicuous flatfish swimming in extant octopodids (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae), and reconstructed ancestral states, to examine potential influences on the evolution of this rare defence mechanism. We address the order of trait distribution to explore whether conspicuous flatfish swimming may be an exaptation that usurps a previously evolved form of locomotion for a new purpose. Contrary to our predictions, based on the relationships we examined, flatfish swimming appears to have evolved concurrently with extremely long arms, in a clade of sand-dwelling species. The conspicuous body colour pattern displayed by swimming T. mimicus may represent a secondary adaptation potentially allowing for mimicry of a toxic sole, improved disruptive coloration, and/or aposematic coloration.

    If you have a free account with Research gate, you can download the full pdf- it has pics of the mimic's relatives:

    http://www.researchgate.net/profile...adaptation/links/00463539b96653a1d5000000.pdf
     
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  14. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    I repeat: Octopuses are NOT aliens
    Rant by PZ Meyers in his Pharyngula blog
     

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