Blue Ring (or other) help.

Discussion in 'Octopus Care' started by KidTako, Feb 26, 2009.

  1. KidTako

    KidTako Pygmy Octopus Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Aloha~

    I have heard that Blue Ring are pretty hardy and easy to keep.
    True/False?

    I would love to get a little buddy about the size of the "Blue" with a Stone Fish or Frog Fish in the same tank. Or are there other type(s) of small octo and fish combos that would play nice and not destroy eachother?

    Mahalo~:bluering:
     
  2. OB

    OB Colossal Squid Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2003
    Messages:
    3,084
    Likes Received:
    46
    :welcome: once more, KidTako.

    Bluering octopus are deadly poisonous, so may well survive their keeper, although I would not put that down to hardiness... Stonefish can be lethal also and will swallow anything the size of their mouth that happens to swim/stroll past, such as a small octopus. Normally, a post like this would therefore be considered as eminating from the mysterious mountain forests of Norway, but I will gladly give you the benefit of the doubt :wink:

    So, no, the keeping of bluering octopus outside of a research environment is strongly discouraged and not the material for "oh yeah?! I'll show you rebellion!" excercises; people do die of bluering bites, seriously. Keeping a small octopus or cuttlefish with a midsize predatory fish is generally a bad, bad idea, unless Stonefish would have some innate knowledge of what species not to touch, not even with a ten foot lure... I know some predators do under some circumstances, but I'll refrain from commenting in this case.

    To refine my response; octopus keeping can be very rewarding, if you limit yourself to diurnal species of smaller size.

    Big species such as O. vulgaris or GPO will challenge most non-professional tank keepers to beyond their capacities. Bimacs are very social and often available through the trade. It is best to keep the octopus solitary, as it is its preferred state in the wild, also. Bar prey items, of course, that it readily welcomes into its den for a "special tea" :wink:

    Edit: finding a stonefish to keep (solitary) in a tank is a daunting task. A number of dealers/LFS's will tell you they can get them, but you usually end up with a scorpionfish of sorts, hardly ever S. verrucosa or S. horrida.
     
  3. KidTako

    KidTako Pygmy Octopus Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    10
    Likes Received:
    0
    Yup, knew that Blue's bite can take out 20 or 30 grown men in seconds, so they are definitely not for snuggling.
    As far as Frogs and Octo go, I’ve seen an octo crawl over the face of a smaller Frog Fish (not on purpose I think) trying to evade a few divers. Out of the hundreds I’ve seen separately, that’s all the interaction between the two I’ve ever seen. So I didn’t know if "tank life” between very specific species of each would yield a “this side of the tank is MINE and this side is YOURS” symbiosis. Would be quite the tank pairing though if they would play nice.
    So, in the end I’ll most likely keep a little Two Spot.
     
  4. Colin

    Colin Colossal Squid Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2002
    Messages:
    3,986
    Likes Received:
    6
    ...and they are lousy pets that are very far from being able to keep, partly because they ship so poorly, are exported as adults and normally live about 8 months in total
     
  5. cthulhu77

    cthulhu77 Titanites Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2003
    Messages:
    6,642
    Likes Received:
    2
    why would you place the fish's favourite food in the tank with it? those things love to eat octopus.
     

Share This Page