[Octopus]: Blue-ring Brooding

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Journals' started by Neogonodactylus, Apr 30, 2014.

  1. Neogonodactylus

    Neogonodactylus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    137
    I received a pair of H. lunulata from the Philippines two wees ago. I tried mating them shortly after they arrived and they would have nothing to doe with one another. I separated them and later in the day noticed that the female was holding eggs. When I photographed her, the eggs were developing and were at the early eyespot stage - about 10 days along in their development. H lunulata female brooding eyespot 4 17 14 med.jpg

    I've photographed the female and her eggs every day since. The next milestone was the first appearance of chromatophores H lunulata female eggs first chromatophores 4 24 14 crop.jpg

    Yesterday the chromatophores became functional and began expanding and contracting.

    H lunulata eggs 4 29 14 crop.jpg

    With all of my poking and prodding to photograph the eggs, I'm amazed that she has been able to hang onto the eggs. They are not attached to her body; just held in folds in the web. H lunulata female brooding 4 21 14 med.jpg
    The embryos should hatch in a day or two and I will try to get get shots of their release.
     
    Architeuthoceras likes this.
  2. Nancy

    Nancy Titanites Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2002
    Messages:
    5,584
    Likes Received:
    71
    Location:
    Dallas Texas
    Interesting photos, as usual. Looking forward to the photos of the embryos hatching!

    Nancy
     
  3. mucktopus

    mucktopus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2003
    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    51
    stunning detail on the embryonic chromatophores!!
     
  4. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,083
    Likes Received:
    1,128
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    As always, love it when you post your photos and I am still with @mucktopus about that coffee table book!

    The eggs look like they are tied together in some kind of bunches with that odd green stick like substance I noticed with O. briareus. Do you know what it is made from?
     
  5. _divad

    _divad Larval Mass Registered

    Joined:
    May 4, 2014
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Richmond, Ca
    Wow! Thank you for sharing this! Beautiful!!
     
  6. Neogonodactylus

    Neogonodactylus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    137
    H lunulata eggs 5 6 14 crop.jpg Not sure what is going on. I posted additional pictures of the eggs just prior to hatching and they have disappeared. Here is one of the last shots.

    Roy H lunulata eggs 5 6 14 crop.jpg
     
    tonmo and Moonlight & Stardust like this.
  7. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

    Joined:
    May 30, 2000
    Messages:
    8,739
    Likes Received:
    516
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    these are awesome. Shared this on Facebook :thumbsup:
     
  8. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,083
    Likes Received:
    1,128
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    I don't see any indication in the pictures but when you examined these was there any indication of the blue ring iridescence?

    @Neogonodactylus, another question just occurred to me. Can she bite while holding the eggs? It would appear not and reconfirms the thought that the poison is not a defense mechanism.
     
  9. Neogonodactylus

    Neogonodactylus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    137
    There is no blue in the hatchlings and none that I could see before they died two days after hatching. I didn't get any good shots of hatching and only one bad image of a hatchling swimming in the aquarium.

    The female was extremely aggressive and attacked a probe brought near her. She would reach out with the 1st pair of arms, rear up so that her mouth was facing the object and pull it in to her mouth where I assume she tried to bite it. This happened repeatedly. Generally when you pester a blue-ring with a stick they will swim away. Not this female. She stood her ground and fought. On the other hand, when II presented a shrimp, it was rejected and pushed away. H lunulata hatchling 5 9 14 B.jpg H lunulata hatchling 5 9 14.jpg
     
    DWhatley likes this.
  10. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,083
    Likes Received:
    1,128
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Were you able to test the hatchlings for toxicity or have you already determined they are not born with the TTX?
     
  11. Neogonodactylus

    Neogonodactylus Haliphron Atlanticus Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2003
    Messages:
    658
    Likes Received:
    137
    The 1 day old hatchlings have TTX. See Williams et al., 2011, Ontogeny of Tetrodotoxin Levels in Blue-Ringed Octopuses: Maternal Invesment and Apparent Independent Production of Offspring of Hapalochlaena lunulata. J. Chem. Ecol. 37:10-17.
     
  12. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,083
    Likes Received:
    1,128
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    Thanks @Neogonodactylus , I could read the abstract and a bit of the first page but, not being a student, don't have a subscription to Springer. I DID add this link and one recent PDF I found from your group to our Cephalopod Species (by family) Octopodidiae -> Hapalochlaena - Blue Ring Octopuses page. If there is a PDF or free access site, please let me know and I will change the link. Interesting that TTX was found in O. bocki's digestive system and the mention in an Abdopus. Guesses suggest that it may be quite common but only a few animals have evolved to use it.
     

Share This Page