Bimac or Mercatoris?

Brock Fluharty

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#1
I bought my 40 gallon tank frommy uncle a year or so back, and I just punched in the dimensions into an online converter that tells the gallonage, and it turns out the 40 is really a 47. I assume that my octopus will not miss the 3 gallons smaller than recommended for a bimac ;)

Well, which should I get? A bimac, or a mercatoris? I already have cycled sand, live rock, and water to put into the 40 (it's RO), so it will not need any cycling time. I have a filter rated for 125 gallons, and then a power filter rated for 80 gallons. I'm leaning towards the bimac (duh...) just because they aren't nocturnal, and are more interactive. I'll also have fun giving him enrichments, etc. Why did I even post this question again? Lol. Well, I guess i'm more of letting you know that i'm getting a bimac instead. I'll have to PM marinebio_guy huh?
 

Illithid

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#2
Brock Fluharty;81386 said:
I already have cycled sand, live rock, and water to put into the 40 (it's RO), so it will not need any cycling time.
I would wholeheartedly disagree with this statement. The whole system has to balance itself, the bacteria has to replant and take hold. Also other bacteria will die off that is now under rocks and not getting as much flow as it used to in a different placement.

I would also consider a brierius, only because they are tropical and are more comfortable at higher temperatures (75-80).
 

Brock Fluharty

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#3
Yes, but it will not take the 4 months that I would have taken to cycle it if I started fresh. I have done this many times, and with many systems. I test regularly, and always the params have remained stable. The 47 gallon has been cycled for a long time, and held seahorses, but I just drained it last night, and left the sand in it with some water, and I will be filling it up today. As I said, I kept seahorses in this tank, and they were a temperate species. Without a heater or chiller, this tank is stably 68*F. I won't be able to get my octopus for another 4 weeks anyway.
 

DrBatty

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#5
I'm noticing an increase in availability for O. Aculeatus recently as well. I dunno if you'd be interested in one [although 68 is about the right temp for them, they are tropical].
they do become diurnal like bimacs....and I find them to be excellent mimics, their displays are incredible, as well as being really social [mine was just playing tug with me earlier]. Thought I'd just chime in.... :o)
 

Brock Fluharty

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#6
Hmm...i'll have to consider those then. I was gonna get a CB bimac from marinebio_buy, but my mom won't let me spend $100 (includes shipping). So, i'm getting a "Common Octopus" from my LFS...
 

DrBatty

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#7
Brock Fluharty;81452 said:
Hmm...i'll have to consider those then. I was gonna get a CB bimac from marinebio_buy, but my mom won't let me spend $100 (includes shipping). So, i'm getting a "Common Octopus" from my LFS...
YIKES! watch out for those labeled "common octopus". You may be getting a whole lot more than what you signed up for.....They can grow a lot bigger than your tank is set up for....just a head's up
 

monty

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#8
Brock Fluharty;81452 said:
Hmm...i'll have to consider those then. I was gonna get a CB bimac from marinebio_buy, but my mom won't let me spend $100 (includes shipping). So, i'm getting a "Common Octopus" from my LFS...
Have you explained to your mom that the bimac will be a known species of a known young age, and so it is almost certainly going to live longer and be better suited to your tank size and temperature than a "could be anything octopus"? I'm not sure if this is a good or bad thing to mention, but the difference between $100 and whatever the LFS store would charge is probably very small compared to the cost of food over the time you'll have the octo (and, presumably, the money you've put into the tank setup.) This is (IMHO) really "penny wise, pound foolish."
 

DHyslop

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#10
I think the younger you get it the better chance you have. The flip side of that is a young animal is going to need more specialized foods like amphipods and mysid shrimp.

On the other hand, if you don't know that you can afford it you might consider some clownfish instead. They live a lot longer and cost a few hundred times less to feed.

Dan
 

Brock Fluharty

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#11
I can afford it, trust me. My mom just doesn't like me to spend that much on one thing. My lfs said I can trade in some corals for an octo,so it's basically fre. I have a 75 reef, 60 reef, and then the 47. I can afford it...

Brock

P.S.-my 75 reef has a pair of ocellaris clowns.
 

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