Best Size tank

Discussion in 'Cuttlefish Care' started by lance, Mar 6, 2009.

  1. lance

    lance Wonderpus Registered

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    What would you guys or girls think a good size tank for Sepia bandensis would be? also what kinda temperature and flow and lighting would you recommend as well?

    thanks,

    Lance

    :read:
     
  2. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    Because I keep 7 saltwater tanks, maintenance is a major consideration. My tanks are art through out the house so esthetics are also high on my list of what I do and don't want for an aquarium. One thing I insist on is black backing all of them. If the tank does not have a black back (used purchase), I add one with a self stick plastic.

    The 45 hex and 60 gallon split are my favorites for maintenance. My 140 corner pent is almost too big (it is 3 feet tall) and I dread getting to it on Sat (esthetically, however, I would not want to eliminate it). The hex is nicely compact and sits tall enough that getting to the small sump in the cabinet is easy and I can lift the sump hood and hold it over a bucket to drain. It is by far my fastest weekly water change and clean up. We performed a series of adjustments to the hex that I would recommend if you have the options (it is acrylic so mods are more doable than glass). We moved the centered overflow back so that it is about 4" from the back wall. It still has 360 top skim (by far the best draining set up) but now takes up less viewing space and supports a nice looking rock pile and room for a front sand area. We also removed the top (non-supporting on this tank) and replaced it with a hinged cover with heat escape holes (also acrylic). We have since added hinged covers to most of the larger tanks because of the major convenience over a removable.

    Give some strong thought to you cabinet or stand and make it taller and wider than you think you need. Your body needs some wiggle room - more than you would think.:heee:

    Since you are starting with a new tank, have it drilled for the overflow(s)!!!!! For maintenance, I woudl recommend adding volume with a large sump rather than over-large display. A 35 gallon sump for a 55 is a nice combination, a 10 gallon sump is barely a sump and is too cramped. The taller sump (vs wider) is helpful to keep good depth for your skimmer and pumps with room for power outage draining and helps minimize splash messes.
     
  3. lance

    lance Wonderpus Registered

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    I should have phrased my question like this. I want to raise from an egg to the full length of there life the CuttleFish ( Sepia bandensis ). Does anyone have a recommendation on what size tank for it and what kinda lighting as well as circulation, temperature and feeding from after hatch to adult?????

    thanks,

    Lance
     
  4. Scrounger

    Scrounger Cuttlefish Supporter

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    I just got a new cuttle, and have been reading up on them. I have read that a 20 to 30 gallon tank should suffice for a single Sepia bandensis. Of course, going bigger is always nice. I have mine in a 29 gallon tank. Not that I am an expert by any means. I have only had a few days experience at this point. A good resource is Cephalopods: Octopuses and Cuttlefish for the Home Aquarium available on Amazon.com. Temp should be around 78 degrees F. No specific lighting requirments. Some people claim Halides are too bright and may cause blindness, but this is mainly unsubstantiated. It seems to me the biggest problem with raising from an egg is getting an appropriate live food source while the cuttle is small.
     

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