Bandensis and macroalgae

ekocak

Vampyroteuthis
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Dec 7, 2008
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294
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Upstate NY, USA
#1
Hello,
I'm in the planning stages of acquiring equipment and such, but one avenue I'm curious about recently is the use of macro algae in ceph aquaria, beyond their use in refugia. I am considering a 40 gallon breeder with a 20 gallon sump, but would like to maybe do a "planted" marine tank.
(I know, algae are not true vascular plants), but I so rarely see anyone go for this and always opt for sessile inverts. Are there good non aesthetic reasons for that? I'm reading that certain algae can release harmful chemicals back into the water, so maybe that would be a concern? I'm reading through the forums for macroalgae right now, but would love to hear ideas if you've got them.
Incidentally, I've been pretty successful at keeping FW plants over the years!
Thanks,
Ethan.
 

DWhatley

Certified Ceph Head For Life
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#2
Macro algae has a positive impact on nitrates (the final stage of the ammonia->nitrite->nitrate cycle for waste) AS LONG AS it does not become over saturated and go asexual, releasing massive amounts back into the water. Lighting and keeping it pruned is the solution for preventing the nitrate release and some aquarists do well with it but I've never had a lot of luck with macro algae but this is most likely due to lighting (lack of). Chaeto is often used for nitrate reduction and often considered very desirable for raising bandensis hatchlings but it breaks up easily and can be messy. I currently keep some in an overflow but do need to rinse it well about once a month.
 

DWhatley

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#4
Calerupra is the most notorious (and most plant like) for needing lots of care. I have avoided it for this reason. Some of the "single plant" varieties (Halimida and shaving brushes - Penicillus pyriformis - are hard to keep but are not noted for releasing nitrates. Mangrove shoots are also popular if you have an open top (they need misting with freshwater and the tops need to stay above the water line) and there is one commonly called a sea pansy (not sure of the scientific name) that is also a stand alone plant.
 

DWhatley

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#6
Depending upon your top and creativity, mangroves don't pollute (but don't add much benefit) so feel free to experiment. They are relatively cheap to try and can be "planted" in fresh or saltwater.
 

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