At last, some good news re: commercial whaling

TPOTH

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
#3
Re: At last, some good news re: commercial whaling

Phil said:
Apparantly Japan, Norway and Iceland argued that growing whale numbers threatened declining fish stocks. I ask you...... :x
Awww COME ON!!!! :roll: + :x
Geeez... what next?!

TPOTH
 

Cephkid

Sepia elegans
Supporter
#5
didn't whales just get out of the threatened/endangered list?

BAD WHALERS!!! :x :evil: :x :evil:
 

Scouse

Haliphron Atlanticus
Registered
#6
Big applause from me, blood boilin stuff that.


For very pint of guinness i drink this weekend im goin to donate a big applause to those that eventually took the humungous step (cough) of banning this.


:beer:
 

main_board

Vampyroteuthis
Supporter
#8
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20051108/ap_on_re_as/japan_whaling

Wasn't sure whether or not our friendly Yahoo! news thingy was working so I posted this here (I cannot post in the news forum). As Steve said earlier in this thread, its not over yet. I just can't believe that some people can still think like this. Maybe Greenpeace could arm the whales with laser beams attached to their heads. :madsci: I'm sure its possible, I mean the US government has apparently trained killer dolphins!

Cheers!
 

main_board

Vampyroteuthis
Supporter
#10
Yeah, I heard that somewhere too (though apparently not in that article). I just can't believe that they're still allowed do this. On the surface it doesn't seem like they're killing a lot (just number wise) compared to other hunted species, but then you remember that these are WHALES and that absolutely everyone is precious and special and cannot be lost. Again, I just can't understand how organizations let whaling happen. Is there nothing more than can be done about this? I mean, they aren't just going to stop themselves, they're not even slowing down!!! There just has to be something more that can be done.

:mad: :mad: :mad:
 

Jean

Colossal Squid
Supporter
#11
and whales have SUCH a slow reproductive rate........mind you I get just as irritated and :mad: when I hear of large shark captures..for the same reasons!

J
 

Feelers

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
#12
I dont mind if they kill whales, (I personally love them), but if they are were a sustainable resource it would be fine with me. However its obviously not very sustainable, and they just pretend that it is.
A humpback whale is worth about $3 million dollars, so its a pretty lucrative business and you can see why Japan yeilds a lot of power over the system.
The next whale conference isnt going to be as happy as the outcome of this one. Japan keeps persuading new countries to join, by bribing them, changing the vote count.
Why would landlocked Mongolia be interested in whaling? With the stupid current system they now have as poweful a vote as any other country.

Im sure the enormous mongolian fishing industry is angry :smile: All none of them.
 

TPOTH

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
#13
Feelers said:
Why would landlocked Mongolia be interested in whaling? With the stupid current system they now have as poweful a vote as any other country.
Fair enough but the flip side is then "who should be allowed to vote on those issues?". Only countries with access to the sea? Only countries with access to oceans with whales in it (e.g. not the Mediterranean countries)? Only the countries with the required technical might (removing poorer countries from the talks)? Only the countries with an interest (past or present) in whaling?
Easy to see that as we consider a smaller group of countries, the relative weight of the pro-whaling increases and they wouldn't have to spread themselves thin lobbying so many countries.

But yeah, i get (and agree with) your point in that whaling countries are generally rich and well able to buy other countries' votes with trade promises (or threats for that matter).

Solution? beats me.... A environmental dictatorship that would enforce the ban on whaling with submarines allowed to sink whalers on sight? Where do I sign for that? :twisted:

Im sure the enormous mongolian fishing industry is angry :smile: All none of them.
I would move house if I were you. Just in case....

TPOTH
 

bigGdelta

Vampyroteuthis
Supporter
#14
I find myself in a quandry. While I abhor whaling (one of the best moments of my life was swiming with a pod of dolphin out in the gulf stream), I also remember growing up poor in the mississippi delta and making extra money trapping beaver, raccoons, mink and nutria. Japan and Norway obviously don't need the money, while some of the Inuit people do. maybe we could put a moritorium on whaling techniques using anything besides canoes and hand harpoons. If the whalers have a little danger maybe there won't be so many. let's give the whales a chance to take out a few whalers.
 

Feelers

Vampyroteuthis
Registered
#16
I tried my first jellyfish last nite as a matter of fact. No flavour, more of a texture, similar to squid but more gelatinous. Personally I think whale would be fantastic - enormous steaks. If only aquaculturing them was a vaible option. I would love to go swimming with whales, I have only ever seen them from the shore.

Why would landlocked Mongolia be interested in whaling? With the stupid current system they now have as poweful a vote as any other country.
I just mean the current system is openly exploited by Japan ect to join "token" members. The thing is that the money gained(or bribed) can actually make a difference to a country like Mongolia, so they are even more likely to vote for whaling. Its a tough problem. But with each new member its looking worse for the whales.

I hate the downward spiral everything seems to be going in. I think the answer is by appealing to pop culture. Super hero - Captain Planets of the environment, like Steve Irwin.
Personally I hate the idea of pop, but it sells. Imagine international man of mystery Steve O'Shea, "pimping up" research vessels donning a set of bright gold teeth spelling "Squid'. :grin:

Its kinda like that guy who discoverd a new species of monkey. He is auctioning off the right to name the species, and the money goes into their protection. I would rather see a Starbuck coffeus monkey than no monkey at all.

Now to sell the idea to NBC or some other acronym.
 

main_board

Vampyroteuthis
Supporter
#17
bigGdelta said:
Japan and Norway obviously don't need the money, while some of the Inuit people do. maybe we could put a moritorium on whaling techniques using anything besides canoes and hand harpoons. If the whalers have a little danger maybe there won't be so many. let's give the whales a chance to take out a few whalers.
Absolutely agree 100%! Besides, the Inuit and other aboriginal peoples have always known and been able to hunt sustainably without any science or governmental regulations. They know that you don't kill more than is necessary, as when you do it is you run the risk of dying out.

I think all environmental bodies everywhere should be turned over to the aboriginal people of the area until us westerners (or whoever else lives there) catch up.

Cheers!
 

Jean

Colossal Squid
Supporter
#18
Matt Jones said:
Well, soon it's just going to be us and jellyfish... The fishing industry is starting to piss me off. No, wait, we can eat jellyfish. Well, us and plankton.
Welllllll actually just us! Antarctic Krill is made into surimi paste yummmmeeee :yuck: and good ol' spirulina is a brackish water phyto stuff!

j
 

Phil

Colossal Squid
Supporter
Registered
#19
Disturbing news indeed from the International Whaling Commission. Several new countries have joined the pro-whaling bloc, this could tip the hand of the voting to a partial return to commercial whaling on Friday. The pro-whaling bloc will be in the majority in the IWC.

How could this happen? Behind the scenes dealing, back-handers and trade agreements in return for votes?

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/5066538.stm
 

Members online

No members online now.