Amphioctopus burryi (Caribbean Armstripe, Brownstriped Octopus) Voss, 1950

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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There are several good photographs and descriptions in this paper. The link has a free to view PDF (Thank you Dr. Hanlon!) It also goes over some of the behaviors that are more typical of young octos that should be helpful for other species.

Body Patterning and Field Observations of Octopus Burryi Voss, 1950
Authors: Hanlon, Roger T.; Hixon, Raymond F.

Source: Bulletin of Marine Science, Volume 30, Number 4, October 1980 , pp. 749-755(7)

Publisher: University of Miami - Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science


Full article available: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/search/article?option1=tka&value1=octopus+burryi&pageSize=10&index=1

Abstract:

Octopus burryi Voss, 1950 was observed and photographed in situ at St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands during a saturation dive mission in NOAA's underwater habitat NULS-1. These first observations of the live animal suggest that it inhabits open sand and mud substrates, that it utilizes a fast, efficient burying maneuver to hide and that it is an ambush predator. O. burryi exhibited a repertoire of seven body patterns under two broad categories: acute and chronic, depending upon their duration. They were composed of different combinations of the 26 chromatic, textural and postural components. In general these patterns and components are similar to those observed in other members of the genus Octopus, but O. burryi may be distinguished from them by its very distinctive brown longitudinal arm stripes, poorly developed white frontal spots, grained skin texture, white transverse mantle streak and integumental trellis arrangement. Live coloration and body patterning may be useful in comparative studies of the behavior and taxonomy of octopuses.
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
Staff member
Moderator
#2
Further Description of Octopus Burryi Voss with a Note on its Distribution Voss, Gilbert L. 1951 - full PDF available

Abstract:

The former knowledge of Octopus burryi is supplemented by the description of the male characteristics and the general anatomy of the species. The taxonomic characteristics are clarified by the addition of five new specimens from the Gulf of Mexico, bringing the total known number of individuals to six, and the geographical distribution of the species is discussed.
 

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