Ammonite diet revealed via X-Ray

Discussion in 'Cephalopod Fossils' started by Hajar, Jan 6, 2011.

  1. Hajar

    Hajar Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

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    Just saw this on synchrotron imaging of ammonite mouthparts.
     
  2. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Great stuff Hajar!! :notworth:

    Planktonophagous huh.
     
  3. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

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    Stuck by Kevin, tweeted by me - thanks Hajar!
     
  4. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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    Love the London bus smiley; it was only a matter of time. :)

    This has got to be the most astounding image of ammonite 'teeth' yet revealed - surely. I wonder how they compare to Nautilus radula teeth?
     
  5. Phil

    Phil Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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  6. tonmo

    tonmo Titanites Staff Member Webmaster Moderator

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    Amazing. Had to watch that one twice to wrap my brain around it. Very cool - thanks Phil!
     
  7. Terri

    Terri Sepia elegans Registered

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    :shock: Wow! :shock:
     
  8. hallucigenia

    hallucigenia O. bimaculoides Supporter

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    "Outside of cephalopods, the radula in Baculites most closely resembles that in heteropod mollusks (multicuspidate, with sabrelike marginal teeth); they feed on plankton and gelatinous prey (18)."

    Cool stuff. Bootleg PDF attached.
     

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  9. cuttlegirl

    cuttlegirl Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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  10. cuttlegirl

    cuttlegirl Colossal Squid Supporter Registered

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  11. Architeuthoceras

    Architeuthoceras Architeuthis Staff Member Moderator

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    Thanks for the papers CG and Hal. :notworth:

    This leads to speculation on the arms and webbing... a large net to capture plankton? Or dangling down like Jellyfish with some kind of stickum? :heee:
     
  12. Hajar

    Hajar Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

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    Yes, thanks Hallucigenia and cuttlegirl for the papers.

    The images are wonderful.

    Overall this supports the consensus of the past couple of decades (e.g. Morton & Nixon 1987, Seilacher 1983, Kennedy et al. 2002, etc.), so no great revelations here. I don't remember seeing the link between diet and end-Cretaceous extinction spelled out before though (scavenging nautilids sail right through).

    This was Morton & Nixon (1987): ".. the function of the large shovel-like lower jaw was the collection of large numbers of small prey. The bluntness of the beaks makes them unsuitable for biting (KAISER & LEHMANN, 1971, 29–30), and the apparent absence of distinctive areas of either lower or upper jaw for insertion of strong muscles indicates that a crushing or shearing action is unlikely. However, the broad rounded surfaces of the lower and upper jaws brought closer together by vertical and/or lateral movement to one another would, together with the actions of the buccal complex, provide an ideal
    mechanism for the expulsion of large volumes of water while retaining trapped prey.”

    Seilacher (2007), (in your trace fossil book, Kevin) writes " .. no one has ever found impressions of the arms, which were probably reduced to a delicate filter fan."
     

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  13. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

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    This is definitely the microscope of the future! With on-line media sharing so wide spread, hopefully we will see more rederings like this of all sorts of things. Hopefully it will be like sonograms and become a must have for many labs.
     
  14. Hajar

    Hajar Haliphron Atlanticus Registered

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    It is a wonderful tool D. See this from a few years ago on imaging of fossil insects in opaque amber.
     
  15. POD-L

    POD-L O. bimaculoides Registered

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    Great thread, so much to learn!
     
  16. winglessgnome

    winglessgnome Pygmy Octopus Registered

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    This was really interesting. I wasn't aware that despite the abundance of ammonite fossils, we know so very little about them or their life history.
     
  17. Pr0teusUnbound

    Pr0teusUnbound GPO Registered

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