Algae Troubles

marineboy

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Ok, since the thread "starting my saltwater tank" I have been succesful in creating a stable and healthy environment for a couple marine species found off the California coast.

But I have had trouble recently with algae. It is a thin layer of orange-like algae that has grown on all the walls of the tank and on the inside chamber of my SeaClone protein skimmer. Can I just scrape it off with an algae scraper? Or is there a reason its growing on my tank? Its getting hard to see the tank with it blurring up the glass!

thanks,

~Michael
 

Nancy

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I'm unfamiliar with orange algae, but any algae can be scraped off and siphoned out in a water change. Some types of snails will eat the algae and keep your tank clean, too. Perhaps someone familiar with the California sea life could recommend some algae eaters for you.

Nancy
 

clownfish

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i had a similar problem but with bubble algea try a clean up crew ( a bunch of snails and hermits, and mabe a sea star that should clean up your tank in a few weeks and keep it that way until you get an octopus to eat them.
 

Tako_Poke

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Behold!!! The moon snail! Tremble in fear at the all consuming destroyer of algae! To simply look upon the beast is to see the death of all aquatic plantlife! Revel in its glory as your eyes burn within their sockets and your mind screams out in chorus with your mouth at the site of that which should not be seen.
Oh wait... No no sorry they eat clams. But you might try some sea hares. They are especially good with hair algae.
So yeah... I hear they are native to calif. Id get one if I were you. Good luck with algae.
-Nick
 

cthulhu77

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Check your phosphate levels...you may need to do some water changing when you start to see matting algaes, especially the red/orange varieties.
 

monty

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Tako_Poke said:
But you might try some sea hares. They are especially good with hair algae.
So yeah... I hear they are native to calif. Id get one if I were you.
Yeah, I see sea hares a lot around Laguna, so I bet they're pretty common down by you. They're pretty big, though, and I have no idea what they eat... There are also those little black turban snails that live around tidepools on the whole CA coast... but again, I don't know what these eat, just that they're common, and fit in your theme for "local intertidal life."
 

Tako_Poke

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monty said:
Yeah, I see sea hares a lot around Laguna, so I bet they're pretty common down by you. They're pretty big, though, and I have no idea what they eat... There are also those little black turban snails that live around tidepools on the whole CA coast... but again, I don't know what these eat, just that they're common, and fit in your theme for "local intertidal life."
Seahares are extremely usefull for eating unwanted algae, but watch out they will also eat the wanted macro algae too. What kind are there in califorinia? I had an eared sea hare and it got HUGE. What kind of tank of tank does marineboy have?
 

marineboy

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an 18 gallon running on the berlin system with 6 pieces of live rock and assorted southern california inertidal life. (sculpins, hermits, minnows, and so forth)
 

marineboy

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do you think that a bat star could solve the problem? I see turban snails all the time and small sea hares to but the sea hares release there digestive system when they are threatened so I think they may mess up the tank. I was thinking of adding a bat star very soon anyway but I thought that all sea stars eat mussels and other bi-valves...

~Michael
 

cuttlegirl

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Originally posted by marineboydo you think that a bat star could solve the problem? I see turban snails all the time and small sea hares to but the sea hares release there digestive system when they are threatened so I think they may mess up the tank. I was thinking of adding a bat star very soon anyway but I thought that all sea stars eat mussels and other bi-valves...
Bat stars usually eat stuff they find on the bottom of the ocean, I can't remember if they eat algae, but they might...

Turban snails will probably help with the algae problem.

Sea hares (Aplysia californica) release purple ink, and sea cucumbers release their "guts". Sea hares may be ok, but they are pretty delicate and if they die, they will affect your water chemistry. I wouldn't recommend them unless you can get your tank temperature 68 or under...

Sea cucumbers eat detritus, and are more delicate than sea hares, so I wouldn't recommend them for your tank either, plus they don't eat algae.

Not all sea stars eat bivalves...

Good luck, it is probably related to your tank cycling and remember some algae is good.
 



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