Abdopus aculeatus (d'Orbigny 1834) Algae/Shaggy Octopus

monty

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#1
Is there a consensus in the taxonomic community as to whether we should say Abdopus aculeatus or Octopus aculeatus? I saw that it's A. on Mucktopus' web site, referring to Norman, yet Norman's book says O.

And is Abdopus now synonymous with "Octopus Horridus Complex"?

Just curious...
 

tonmo

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#2
:confused: I had never heard of Abdopus. :oops:

Bumping this in hopes Chrissy stops by!
 

Neogonodactylus

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#3
Crissy can probably straighten this out better than I can, but see:

NORMAN, M.D. & FINN, J. 2001. Revision of the Octopus horridus species-group,
including erection of a new subgenus and description of two member species from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Invertebrate Taxonomy. 15: 13 – 35.

The description of O. aculeatus was originally by D’ORBIGNY in 1834.

Roy
 

jc45

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#4
Neogonodactylus said:
NORMAN, M.D. & FINN, J. 2001. Revision of the Octopus horridus species-group,
including erection of a new subgenus and description of two member species from the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Invertebrate Taxonomy. 15: 13 – 35.
Here's the abstract of that article...

http://www.publish.csiro.au/?paper=IT99018

NORMAN said:
Attributes of this group of octopuses are described and the subgenus Abdopus, subgen. nov. is here coined to define this group.
So it looks like Abdopus is the genus for the O. horridus species complex. I'm interested in reading the paper.

Joey
 

mucktopus

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#5
Norman coined the "Octopus horridus" species group in his dissertation (1993). He and Finn (2001) then erected the Abdopus sub-genus for this group. In 2005 Norman and Hochberg elevated Abdopus to a genus, and also resurrected several old generic names for other species groups (i.e. Callistoctopus for the Octopus macropus group; "The Cutrrent State of Octopus Taxonomy" from the proceedings of the 2003 the meeting of the Cephalopod International Advisory Committee).

So long story short- Joey is correct- the former "Octopus horridus species group" is now the genus Abdopus, and includes the species: A. horridus, A. aculeatus, A. abaculus, A. capricornus, and several others we hope to have described in the next year or so.

hope this helps,
Crissy
 

Taollan

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#7
mucktopus;93549 said:
In 2005 Norman and Hochberg elevated Abdopus to a genus, and also resurrected several old generic names for other species groups (i.e. Callistoctopus for the Octopus macropus group; "The Cutrrent State of Octopus Taxonomy" from the proceedings of the 2003 the meeting of the Cephalopod International Advisory Committee).
So I am guessing this is the same paper O'Shea rants about here: http://www.tonmo.com/community/index.php?threads/6157/...
 

simple

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#10
I finished reading it today in my spare time at school, it was very interesting, especially how sometimes a male and female will form dens adjacent to each other and mate with out either of them leaving their den.
 

tonmo

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#11
Thanks for sharing! For those who don't know, Chrissy Hufford is "mucktopus" on TONMO.com.
 

DWhatley

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mucktopus

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#14
Abdopus aculeatus ethogram
Given the number of questions about A. aculeatus body patterning and behavior, I looked into posting a paper describing its basic natural history and body patterning. Turns out the journal policy seems ok with this. Hope this is useful!

They do specify though that the citation be listed:
Huffard, C.L. (2007) Ethogram of Abdopus aculeatus (d’Orbigny, 1834) (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae): can behavioral characters inform octopodid taxomony and systematics? Journal of Molluscan Studies 73: 185-193
 

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DWhatley

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#17
Arm Dropping and Regeneration in the Abdopus Complex

Characterizing arm autotomy: an octopus mode of defense
ALUPAY, Jean S., CALDWELL, Roy L. Abstract Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology 2011 Annual Meeting

Meeting Abstract
P3.1 Thursday, Jan. 6 Characterizing arm autotomy: an octopus mode of defense ALUPAY, Jean S.*; CALDWELL, Roy L.; Univ. of California, Berkeley; Univ. of California, Berkeley jsalupay@berkeley.edu

Animals have evolved a diversity of defense mechanisms including cryptic and startling displays, flight response, and inking. Arguably one of the most extreme tactics is autotomy, the voluntary shedding of a limb or body part at a specific cleavage plane, often under neural control. This behavior provides immediate benefits that allow the organism to escape from predators, while simultaneously incurring long-term costs including energetically expensive regeneration. Many studies in reptiles, echinoderms, and crustaceans provide evidence for increased survival in autotomizing individuals. There have only been anecdotal reports of autotomy in various unrelated species of octopus, which have many arms susceptible to loss. We studied one species, Abdopus aculeatus, by stimulating arm loss, preserving them for histological sections, and measuring regeneration. In addition, longitudinal histological sections were performed on the arms of various octopus species to locate the presence of cleavage planes. We found that in A. aculeatus, autotomy often occurs at the base of the arm, where the cleaved ends displayed a clean break and minimal blood loss indicative of voluntary dropping. The time required to stimulate autotomy varied between individuals, but once triggered, cleavage was almost instantaneous. Thrashing and sucker attachment of the newly autotomized limb persisted for nearly an hour, likely functioning as predator distraction. Signs of arm regeneration were evident as early as three weeks after the arm was lost. These results correlated with studies of other arm autotomizing cephalopods. With these data, more quantitative analyses of the costs and benefits of autotomy may be determined along with the evolution of this extreme tactic among cephalopods.
 

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#18
Locomotion by Abdopus aculeatus(Cephalopoda: Octopodidae): walking the line between primary and secondary defenses
Christine L. Huffard (full document) 2006

Introduction
Speeds and variation in body form during crawling, bipedal walking, swimming and jetting by the shallow-water octopus Abdopus aculeatus were compared to explore possible interactions between defense behaviors and biomechanics of these multi-limbed organisms. General body postures and patterns were more complex and varied during the slow mode of crawling than during fast escape maneuvers such as swimming and jetting. These results may reflect a trade-off between predator deception and speed, or simply a need to reduce drag during jet-propelled locomotion. Octopuses swam faster when dorsoventrally compressed, a form that may generate lift, than when swimming in the head-raised posture. Bipedal locomotion proceeded as fast as swimming and can be considered a form of fast escape (secondary defense) that also incorporates elements of crypsis and polyphenism (primary defenses). Body postures during walking suggested the use of both static and dynamic stability. Absolute speed was not correlated with body mass in any mode. Based on these findings the implications for defense behaviors such as escape from predation, aggression, and `flatfish mimicry' performed by A. aculeatus and other octopuses are discussed.
 

DWhatley

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#19
New record of Abdopus aculeatus (d’Orbigny, 1834) (Cephalopoda: Octopodidae) to Indian waters from the Andaman Island, India and its Molecular characterisation
Suneel Kumar Yalla and Dr. R Mohanraju 2017 (article International Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Studies 2017; 5(3): 409-413)

Discussion
...
There are about 7 species of the genus Abdopus reported worldwide and the occurrence of Abdopus horridus was observed in Andaman waters (Venkatraman et al. 2004) [23]. The current study reports the presence of Abdopus aculeatus from Indian waters adding one more species to Abdopus genus from the intertidal habitat. The morphology of the studied specimen was found to resemble closely to Abdopus aculeatus (d’Orbigny, 1834) [10] described by Huffard (2007) [6] and Norman and Finn (2001) [8] but the number of suckers were found to be less (150) when compared to the specimen described by Norman and Finn (2001) [8].
...
 

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