A. Singaporean

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by A. Cuttlefish, Jul 10, 2014.

  1. A. Cuttlefish

    A. Cuttlefish Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Singapore
    Hi all! I discovered TONMO a few years back and now I've finally joined! If you can spot SG on an unmarked map I applaud you. I was first interested about cephalopods when I watched the colossal squid dissection documentary at the age of 6. I've been reading big, thick books about the ocean ever since, as well as watching Blue Planet. I've probably read all of Richard Ross's articles, as well as the one on Reefkeeping a hundred times. A recent sighting of a Sepia Bandensis Pair in an LFS has gotten me back into squids and cuttlefish, and gotten back my nickname, "squid boy" by my friends. I'm going to get a Bandensis Pair at the end of this year, so I decided to join!
     
    DWhatley likes this.
  2. A. Cuttlefish

    A. Cuttlefish Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Singapore
    I wrote this myself: Sepia Bandensis otherwise known as the dwarf or stumpy spined cuttlefish has a natural distribution from Philippines to Indonesia, and can be sighted in Singapore waters. They live in temperatures of 25-28 degrees Celsius, and their trademark behavior is walking on their tentacles over the sea bed, so the sand has to be very fine. Biological filtration has to be extremely efficient for their high bioload, at least three times more than your average fish. A S. Bandensis tank has to be at least 30 gallons for one pair. A protein skimmer should be a must to maintain water clarity. Although S. Bandensis can be trained to eat frozen, you should give them live foods from time to time, and dip any frozen food in vitamins. These cuttlefish grow up to 4-4.5 inches and are very interactive, capable of changing into a myriad of colours and raising up flaps to mimic seaweed. Breeding is possible, you will begin to see mating displays when.they are 4 months old. Cuttlefish can lay up to 225 eggs, but only a small amount are viable. Food for newborns are mysid shrimps. Although I am very knowledgeble on cephalopods, the real Bandensis experts are Richard Ross and all the other Bandensis keepers here on TONMO.
     
  3. DWhatley

    DWhatley Cthulhu Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2006
    Messages:
    19,084
    Likes Received:
    1,131
    Location:
    Gainesville, GA USA
    I'll suggest a change to the
    "and their trademark behavior is walking on their tentacles"
    In many animals tentacles and arms are interchangable and you will see the mixed reference with cephs. However, we deliniate between the two noting that octopus, squid and cuttlefish all have 8 arms but squid and cutlefish (decopods) also have two tentacles used for catching food. The tentacles are considered a distinct suckerless appendage terminating in a club (with either hooks or toothed suckers). You can Google squid tentacles for other references to this distinction.

    There have been a few informal studies that have suggested some of the arms should be qualified as legs (in both octos and cuttles) but the distinction is not popular in the literature.
     
    A. Cuttlefish likes this.
  4. A. Cuttlefish

    A. Cuttlefish Blue Ring Registered

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2014
    Messages:
    46
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Singapore
    Ok, D, here's an updated version: Sepia Bandensis otherwise known as the dwarf or stumpy spined cuttlefish has a natural distribution from Philippines to Indonesia, and can be sighted in Singapore waters. They live in temperatures of 25-28 degrees Celsius, and their trademark behavior is "walking" on their arms over the sea bed, so the sand has to be very fine. Biological filtration has to be extremely efficient for their high bioload, at least three times more than your average fish. A S. Bandensis tank has to be at least 30 gallons for one pair. A protein skimmer should be a must to maintain water clarity. Although S. Bandensis can be trained to eat frozen, you should give them live foods from time to time, and dip any frozen food in vitamins. Although fish is a possible source of food, the cuttlefish's main diet should be crustaceans such as rock crabs and shore shrimps. These cuttlefish grow up to 4-4.5 inches and are very interactive, capable of changing into a myriad of colours and raising up flaps to mimic seaweed. Breeding is possible, you will begin to see mating displays when they are 4 months old. Cuttlefish can lay up to 225 eggs, but only a small amount are viable. Food for newborns are mysid shrimps. Although I am very knowledgeble on cephalopods, the real Bandensis experts are Richard Ross and every other Bandensis keeper in the world.
     
    GPO87 likes this.

Share This Page