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2007 Acquisitions

neuropteris

GPO
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Joined
Jun 25, 2004
Messages
141
#1
Hello folks

I've been a bit quiet this year - haven't been out much collecting and haven't found much when I have but over the last 2 or 3 trips to the seaside have done a little better so thought I'd send some pics of the finds

Firstly a fairly large Andogynoceras maculatum - 8cm found as a glacial erratic on the Holderness coast and prepped for me by Yorkshire Coast fossils

Second one - a double Caenasites also found as an erratic at Holderness and prepped by YCF. The largest ammonite is 5cm

Next one I'm having a go at myself - not finished yet but is coming along ok - a 5inch Hildoceras bifrons plucked from a freshly fallen nodule at Ravenscar last Sunday. Shame about the weathered keel at the mouth border but I wouldn't have seen it if that bit hadn't been sticking out.

Lastly a purchase (gave up hopes of trying to find one), a 7cm Nodiocoeloceras

All the best

Andy
 

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Architeuthoceras

Architeuthis
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Nov 19, 2002
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2,405
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somewhere under the desert sky
#2
Some great fossils Andy. They are all Jurassic I guess? Do they know approximately where those glacial erratics come from?

I'm glad some one is able to get out and get some fossils this summer, hopefully it will cool off a bit here in the next few weeks so I can get out again.:sad:
 

neuropteris

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Jun 25, 2004
Messages
141
#3
Yes, they are all Jurassic - Lias age. As to where the erratics come from I'm not sure. You get a wide variety of material on the beach but the most common fossils seem to be Carboniferous corals in limestone blocks, Lias stuff and cretaceous Speeton Clay nodules (like that big thing I got a year or so ago and still haven't finished prepping). The modern exposures of this sort of material are all further north up the coast but I don't know if the erractics have been picked up from further inland or brought in from exposures now under the North Sea. I'm sure someone out there knows though
 

AndyS

Cuttlefish
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Joined
Apr 13, 2004
Messages
27
#4
Andy,

That double Caenisites is just exceptional. Quite envious, never found one yet !
Just been over myself 2 weeks ago, very little finds...

AndyS
 

neuropteris

GPO
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Jun 25, 2004
Messages
141
#5
Hi Andy

Its a first for me aswell - just the keel of the big one was peeping out when I spotted it - got nothing else special that day though. Must get over to the seaside a bit more before the year end although like you say its not been great recently - had a trip over to Saltwick Bay a few weeks back and came home with one Dac commune.

On the same day as the Androg I got an Arnioceras pebble which I'll try to snap once I've recharged the camera batteries (forgot to turn it off after the last upload -ooops)

Andy
 

DWhatley

Cthulhu
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Sep 4, 2006
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19,910
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Gainesville, GA
#7
Please keep the pictures of your finds active! This looks like such an interesting hobby! I think I would really enjoy both the finding and the cleaning is I knew anything at all about fossils, how to find them and didn't already spend over an hour a day on the tanks. I can envision doing an interior wall in a whole collection.
 

neuropteris

GPO
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Jun 25, 2004
Messages
141
#8
Thanks - glad you like them!

Prepping can be very satisfying when it works out well but the flip side is the frustration of spending hours with the airpen only to find the middle of the ammo isn't there or that it becomes so sticky (matrix won't come off) that you end up digging through the fossil and wrecking it. :cry:

If you wanted to get out and find something yourself your best bet would be to try to see if there's a geological society in your neck of the woods - they are usually very informative and run field trips to your local sites.
 

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